broward county elections
Caitie Switalski / WLRN

With Next Elections Three Months Away, Broward Faces Crisis In Voter Confidence

Many Broward County voters are not confident in their elections office. The drama following the November election put three close statewide races - and Broward's reputation - in the national spotlight. And weeks after midterm recounts ended, voters continue to ask what went wrong.

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Donna Shalala
Caitie Switalski / WLRN

The Trump administration has proposed expanding a policy that would deny green cards to immigrants who access certain public benefits, like food stamps and Medicaid.

That would expand the list of services that some people seeking green cards get penalized for using.

Democrats in Congress spoke out against the proposed regulation in Sunrise Monday morning.

“This proposed rule change has sewn confusion and prompted immigrant families to start avoiding programs they need to raise healthy and productive children,” Congresswoman Debbie Wasserman Schultz said.

Florida’s citrus industry still contributes an estimated $8 billion a year to the state economy. That’s despite its longtime battle against greening - a bacterial disease that sours the fruit and is fatal to the trees.

Panel To Dig Into Health Issues For DeSantis

2 hours ago
Alejandra Martinez / WLRN

Lt. Gov.-elect Jeanette Nuñez and former Agency for Health Care Administration Secretary Alan Levine are co-chairing a committee that could help shape health-care plans for incoming Gov. Ron DeSantis.

The 50-member Transition Advisory Committee on Health and Wellness will hold its first meeting at 1 p.m. Wednesday.

“I’m grateful they asked me to do this,” Levine told The News Service of Florida on Monday, adding, “I was thrilled when I was told (I’d be working with Nunez). Who could be a better co-chair?”

Updated at 4 p.m. ET

President Trump says he will be making a decision "soon" on a new chief of staff. But some of the candidates whose names have been floated for the post say they're not interested.

It seems people are not exactly lining up for the chance to try to organize Trump's impulsive and unpredictable operation, especially in the face of an aggressive special counsel's investigation and newly empowered Democrats in the House of Representatives.

This is the second and final week of the international climate summit in southern Poland, the most consequential United Nations climate meeting since 2015, when the United States helped lead nearly 200 countries to agree to reduce greenhouse gas emissions. But while the U.S. has been an undeniable leader in past negotiations, this year its role is more unpredictable.

Given the rivalries and violence that divide the global community today, it is hard to imagine that on December 10, 1948, the nations of the world approved, almost unanimously, a detailed list of fundamental rights that every human on the planet should enjoy.

J. David Ake / AP

Three Florida lawmakers want to put a price on carbon dioxide emissions. They have recently introduced legislation, called the Energy Innovation and Carbon Dividend Act, which would charge $15 per metric ton of carbon dioxide produced by oil refineries and coal producers. The fee would then increase by $10 per metric ton each year.

At a major climate meeting in Poland, nearly 200 countries are trying to reach a deal on dramatically reducing carbon emissions. But a recent U.N. report found that may not be enough to avoid dangerous impacts from the warming climate. In fact, the world is falling so far short of what's needed, it said, that it might be necessary to pull massive amounts of carbon dioxide out of the air.

Here at Goats and Soda, a feel-good goat story makes us smile like little else. So when we came across pictures of "Sweateredgoats" on Instagram, we wanted to know more.

The goat pics turn out to be about more than making people go "awwwwww."

The caprine fashionistas are featured on a calendar, the sales of which have benefited local organizations in Varanasi, India, where most of the images were taken.

As long as the United States has existed, there's been some version of white supremacy. But over the centuries, the way white supremacy manifests has changed with the times. This includes multiple iterations of the infamous Ku Klux Klan.

According to the sociologist Kathleen Blee, the Klan first surfaced in large numbers in the 1860s in the aftermath of the Civil War, then again in the 1920s, and yet again during the civil rights era.

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