News

Business
2:48 pm
Tue September 24, 2013

Carnival's Earnings Hit By String Of Cruise Ship Problems

Part of the previously submerged, severely damaged right side of the Costa Concordia cruise ship is seen in an upright position last week after it was righted by salvage crews in Isola del Giglio, Italy.
Marco Secchi Getty Images

Originally published on Tue September 24, 2013 3:18 pm

Miami-based Carnival Corp., the world's largest cruise operator, reported a third quarter profit nearly a third lower than a year ago following a series of embarrassing and deadly mishaps involving its ships.

Carnival turned a $934 million profit for the period June through August, down 30 percent from the same quarter in 2012.

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Food
12:06 pm
Tue September 24, 2013

Trader Joe's Ex-President To Turn Expired Food Into Cheap Meals

Doug Rauch wants to take wholesome food that grocers have to throw away and cook and sell it as low-cost, prepared meals.
Bunnyhero Flickr

Originally published on Thu September 26, 2013 5:18 pm

Here's some food for thought: One-third of the world's food goes to waste every year. In the U.S., about 40 percent of our food gets thrown out. It's happening on the farm, at the grocery store and in our own homes.

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Transportation
11:48 am
Tue September 24, 2013

Why Miami-Dade County Is Raising Transit Fares

Jason Nicholson, 31, of South Beach (above with skateboard), said the 25-cent fare increase won't change his use of the 'long distance car,' his nickname for the bus.
Credit Rachel Morello

Miami-Dade bus and Metrorail commuters will soon have to pay 25 cents more to catch a ride.

The county transit system is increasing its fares for the first time in five years to help offset operating costs. The fare for a one-way trip on Metrobus or Metrorail is increasing from $2 to $2.25, effective October 1. The Metromover will remain free for all users.  

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Real Estate
10:47 am
Tue September 24, 2013

Home Prices Rise At Best Pace In Seven Years

This home was under contract last month in Chicago.
Scott Olson Getty Images

Originally published on Tue September 24, 2013 12:02 pm

Led by more strong gains in Las Vegas, San Francisco, San Diego and Los Angeles, home prices in major U.S. cities were up just more than 12 percent on average in July vs. July 2012, according to the latest S&P/Case-Shiller Home Price Indices report.

The average increase was the largest since February 2006, Reuters adds, and is yet another sign that the housing sector is among the economy's strongest sectors.

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Neighborhoods
10:43 am
Tue September 24, 2013

How I-95 Shattered The World Of Miami's Early Overtown Residents

Agnes Rolle Morton (left) and her sister Naomi Yvonne Rolle reminisce about growing up in Overtown before the construction of I-95 through the neighborhood on Jan. 29, 2012 in Liberty City.
Credit Daniel Bock

When Naomi Rolle talks about her childhood home in Overtown, tears fall from her eyes.

Her father, Jerod Hastings Rolle, and his mother — her grandmother — constructed the cozy peach-colored home with swirling concrete pillars in the 1920s.

“It was beautiful,” she said. “It was one of the only houses built with concrete and stucco. The other homes around us were made out of wood.”

Rolle, who now lives in Liberty City, is among thousands who were forced out of their homes in the 1960s to make room for Interstate 95 and later, Interstate 395.

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People
9:04 am
Tue September 24, 2013

Crash Stops Cross-Country Charity Bike Ride, Miles From Goal

Jacob Landis has been riding his bike to every Major League Baseball stadium, to raise money to help the needy pay for cochlear implants. His ride ended Saturday night due to a crash — but Landis says he'll still be at the Marlins' stadium next week.
Jacob's Ride

Originally published on Sun September 22, 2013 4:24 pm

Cyclist Jacob Landis, who rode more than 10,000 miles on his bike this year to raise money for cochlear implants, will miss out on the final miles of his ride after being hit by a truck. Landis had planned to ride his bike to every Major League Baseball stadium this season. Despite the crash, he says he'll still go to the final game on his schedule.

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Environment
7:31 am
Tue September 24, 2013

How Many Scientists Does It Take To Write A Climate Report?

An iceberg floats through the water in Ilulissat, Greenland, in July. Researchers are studying how climate change and melting glaciers will affect the rest of the world.
Joe Raedle Getty Images

Originally published on Tue September 24, 2013 10:53 am

Scientists and government representatives are meeting in Stockholm this week to produce the latest high-level review of climate change. It's thousands of pages of material, and if it's done right, it should harbor very few surprises.

That's because it's supposed to compile what scientists know — and what they don't — about climate change. And that's left some scientists to wonder whether these intensive reviews are still the best way to go.

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Technology
2:19 pm
Mon September 23, 2013

Apple Sells 9 Million New iPhones In Opening Weekend

Apple says it has sold 9 million iPhone 5s and 5c models since their launch on Friday. Here, staff members at an Apple retail store in Beijing cheer a customer after he bought a new iPhone.
Andy Wong AP

Originally published on Mon September 23, 2013 3:29 pm

Sales of its new iPhone 5s and 5c models have surpassed other iPhone releases and exceeded initial supply, Apple says. The company says it has sold 9 million of the phones since their launch on Friday and that "many online orders" will ship in coming weeks.

"This is our best iPhone launch yet — more than nine million new iPhones sold — a new record for first weekend sales," Apple CEO Tim Cook said in a Monday press release. He added that "while we've sold out of our initial supply of iPhone 5s, stores continue to receive new iPhone shipments regularly."

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Water
2:11 pm
Mon September 23, 2013

U.S. House Panel Rejects Proposal To Federalize Florida-Georgia Water Dispute

Fishermen oystering in Apalachicola Bay.
Credit Stan Kirkland/FWC

Oysters in Northwest Florida are dying off from a lack of fresh water and the oyster industry is struggling because of it.

Much of the freshwater that would normally flow from Georgia into Apalachicola Bay is being cut off and redirected to Atlanta where the growing population needs more water.

Steve Southerland, a congressman who represents the North Florida district heavily hit by the water shortage, proposed a change to the way water management works between Florida and Georgia.

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Environment
8:23 am
Mon September 23, 2013

Drone Watches Over Florida Keys Marine Sanctuary

Lt. j.g. Kyle Salling launches an unmanned aircraft that NOAA is testing for science purposes in the Florida Keys National Marine Sanctuary.
Credit Cammy Clark / MIAMI HERALD Staff

Lt. j.g. Kyle Salling stood on the bow of a 24-foot boat in Florida Bay, holding what looked like a large model airplane. With the propellers gently whirling, and the small red and green aviation lights on, Sims launched the 13-pound aircraft like he was throwing a javelin.

The remote-controlled Puma AE banked upward into the sky and began heading toward its target, a mangrove island called Pigeon Key about a quarter-mile away in the vast Florida Keys National Marine Sanctuary.

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Redevelopment
2:09 pm
Fri September 20, 2013

Miami Beach Convention Center Referendum Canceled After Court Decision

The entrance to Hall A of the Miami Beach Convention Center.
Credit MARSHA HALPER / Miami Herald Staff

An appeals court on Friday left Miami Beach to cancel a planned referendum on a $1 billion renovation of the city’s convention center, ruling commissioners must first approve a lease that voters could then consider.

The ruling comes a day before Miami Beach plans to print its ballot for the November 5 election, and the city’s attorney said there will be no time to appeal the decision by the Third District Court of Appeal.

Jose Smith, the attorney, said the lease negotiations with a development team South Beach ACE will probably last through the spring.

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Politics
12:26 pm
Fri September 20, 2013

Food Stamp Fight: Great For GOP Base But Not For Outreach

During George W. Bush's presidency, Republican leaders won praise for expanding food assistance. Now the House GOP is drawing criticism for cutting it.
Matt Rourke AP

Originally published on Fri September 20, 2013 3:34 pm

The Republican-controlled House's vote to cut $40 billion from the food stamp program is just the latest example of how the GOP balance of power has shifted rightward over the past decade.

President George W. Bush isn't fondly remembered by progressives for much. But anti-hunger advocates credited him during his administration for strongly supporting the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (the formal name for food stamps) and other policies to help unemployed or low-income workers and their children escape the fear of not knowing where their next meals would come from.

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Americas
10:53 am
Fri September 20, 2013

Death Toll Near 100, And Likely To Rise, From Storms In Mexico

A car lays buried in mud after flooding triggered by Hurricane Manuel in Chilpancingo, Mexico.
Alejandrino Gonzalez AP

Originally published on Fri September 20, 2013 9:45 am

Authorities were saying early Friday that at least 97 people were known to have died in the flooding, mudslides and other deadly after-effects of the two storms that struck the country this week.

Torrential rains and then-Hurricane Manuel lashed the west coast of Mexico, particularly in around Acapulco. Hurricane Ingrid pummeled the east side of the nation, along the Gulf Coast.

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Americas
6:30 pm
Thu September 19, 2013

Beloved Brazilian Monkey Clings To A Shrinking Forest

The wild population of the golden lion tamarin, which lives only in Brazil's Atlantic Forest, fell to just 200 in the 1970s. Conservationists have helped the species rebound, but the monkeys are still at risk as development encroaches on their remaining habitat.
Andrea Hsu NPR

Originally published on Fri September 20, 2013 11:15 am

The tiny, copper-hued golden lion tamarin is so beloved in Brazil that its image graces the country's 20-real bank note. But this lion-maned monkey is in peril.

There's only one place on earth where the golden lion tamarin lives in the wild: in Brazil's Atlantic Forest, or Mata Atlantica, just north of Rio de Janeiro. Deforestation in the region has reduced the monkey's habitat, once a massive ecosystem stretching for a half-million square miles, to just 2 percent of its original size.

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Wall Street
12:37 pm
Thu September 19, 2013

Whale Of A Fine: JPMorgan Chase To Pay $920M In Penalties

The JPMorgan Chase building in London, where traders ran up huge losses.
Timur Emek AP

Originally published on Thu September 19, 2013 11:39 am

JPMorgan Chase has agreed to acknowledge that it violated federal securities laws and will pay $920 million in penalties assessed by regulators in the U.S. and U.K. to settle charges related to the huge trading losses racked up by its London traders last year, the Securities and Exchange Commission announced Thursday morning.

As we wrote earlier this week when word of the pending settlement first emerged, this all:

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