News

Politics
12:00 pm
Mon September 9, 2013

Gov. Scott Tries New Strategy To Boost Business, Jobs

Gov. Rick Scott cuts the ribbon on the new Sand Blaster roller coaster on the Daytona Beach boardwalk. Scott has been traveling the state calling attention to his efforts to boost the economy.
Credit Florida Governor's Office

Gov. Rick Scott is pulling out all the stops to lure companies to Florida.

He convinced lawmakers to cut the sales tax on manufacturing equipment and do away with regulations that could hinder economic growth.

RELATED: The Sunshine Economy: Jobs

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Business
11:22 am
Mon September 9, 2013

How A Miniature Antenna Is Turning The TV Biz On A Dime

Credit Aereo

A TV antenna the size of a dime. That's it below, on the right. Long gone are the days of the RCA console television in your grandparent's (or great grandparent's) living room with two silver rods jutting out at all angles as you squint through the "snow" to catch a glimpse of Looney Tunes.

Thanks to high speed Internet connections and cloud computing, Aereo is disrupting the traditional TV and cable business like very few.

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Business
10:34 am
Mon September 9, 2013

Spirit Airlines Sees Business Take Off With Raunchy Ads

Spirit Airlines has gotten notice — and criticism — for its racy ads.
Courtesy of Spirit Airlines

Originally published on Tue September 10, 2013 5:22 pm

South Florida-based Spirit Airlines is known for being cheap. It boasts "ultralow" base fares and then charges for items such as carry-on luggage or printing out your boarding pass at the airport.

That thrift carries over to Spirit's advertising. Even compared with other low-cost airlines, Spirit spends almost nothing on ads. And yet the company makes a surprising splash with its campaigns. A visit to Spirit headquarters reveals the secrets of its marketing.

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School Health
8:22 am
Mon September 9, 2013

Miami School Health Clinics Are Re-Imagining The Role Of The School Nurse

The school-based health clinic at North Miami Beach Senior High School is a full-service clinic.
Credit Sammy Mack / StateImpact Florida

It’s a Wednesday morning and the waiting room is already starting to fill up at the North Miami Beach Senior High School clinic.

“Go ahead and have a seat.”

A 16-year-old girl with an enormous red bow pinned above her ear approaches the appointment window. A beveled glass pane slides open. The woman behind the desk doesn’t ask for insurance information; she asks to see a hall pass.

The teenager with the red bow takes her place in a waiting room chair next to classmates who, between hushed exchanges of gossip, occasionally erupt in giggles.

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Environment
4:50 pm
Fri September 6, 2013

Florida Bans Importing Deer From Out-Of-State

Credit cwd-info.org

In an effort to keep a potentially fatal disease from decimating the state's deer population, Florida is immediately closing its borders to the importation of out-of-state deer.

The ban comes as a number of deer farmers have reportedly ramped up importation to increase their stocks because of the expected prohibition.

The Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission on Friday unanimously agreed to prohibit the importation of deer and other cervids in an attempt to keep Chronic Wasting Disease from reaching the state's deer population.

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The Florida Roundup
12:33 pm
Fri September 6, 2013

Why Florida Picks Fights With The U.S.

The motto on the first flag to fly over the capitol when Florida became the 27th state seems to be guiding the state's response today to federal programs.
Credit http://dhr.dos.state.fl.us/

Florida’s top prosecutor wants to overturn a federal gun law and allow 18 year-olds to own handguns.  It’s just the latest example of the Sunshine State battling the federal government.  It’s done it over health care, voting rights and now gun control.  

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Diversity
12:32 pm
Fri September 6, 2013

Map Of South Florida Shows How Racially Segregated We Are

A new map clearly demarcates the racial divide in the United States through colorful dots, showing the demographics of South Florida and highlighting the striking partitions of how we live.

For example, most people know that Miami Beach is primarily a mix of white and Hispanic and that North Miami is mostly white east of Biscayne Boulevard and predominantly black on the west side. But there is more that can be read into the map.

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People
10:54 am
Fri September 6, 2013

Florida's Byler Sextuplets Turn Six Years Old

Originally published on Fri September 6, 2013 12:40 pm

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

Good morning. I'm Renee Montagne. Florida's first sextuplets turn 6 this week. And the Byler kids have also started kindergarten - each in separate classrooms.

Apparently, it's been a tough transition with a lot of tears. It's the first time the five brothers and one sister have been on their own since they were born. It also made more work for their mother. She had to bake 120 cupcakes so that each of the six children would have enough for each classroom party.

Health Care
10:41 am
Fri September 6, 2013

After A Decade, Congress Moves To Fix Doctors' Medicare Pay

I think I see the problem.
iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Mon September 9, 2013 7:59 am

Hear the words health care and Congress, and you think fight, right?

And you'd be forgiven, particularly because the House has now voted some 40 times in the past two years to repeal or otherwise undo portions of the Affordable Care Act.

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Civil Rights
2:46 pm
Thu September 5, 2013

How The March On Washington Lives On 50 Years Later For Those Who Weren't There

(Left to right) Tsitsi Wakhisi, Brenda Howard and Arberdella White-Davis.
Credit Tsitsi Wakhisi

For the hundreds of thousands of people who participated in the 1963 March on Washington, many can recount the moving moments of that day.

But for a particular group of four ladies, the impact of the event is still profoundly felt decades later. All were young teens at the time of Martin Luther King’s historic “I Have a Dream” speech, but didn’t attend the march.

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Politics
2:55 pm
Wed September 4, 2013

After The Zimmerman Verdict: How Juries Are Chosen In Florida

Should the jury in the George Zimmerman trial have been more diverse? Zimmerman (in the photo on the right) shot Trayvon Martin (left) in Sanford, Fla. but was acquitted for the killing.

The makeup of the George Zimmerman jury – six women, five of them white – got the attention of Sen. Gwen Margolis, D-Miami when the jury acquitted Zimmerman in the death of 17-year-old Trayvon Martin of Sanford.

Margolis has filed a bill in Tallahassee that would require a 12-member jury for any felony case that might bring life in prison. (Twelve jurors are already required for death penalty cases.)

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Hurricane Season
2:47 pm
Wed September 4, 2013

This Is What It Sounds Like To Be In A Category 5 Hurricane

Hurricane Andrew in 1992 was the last Category 5 hurricane to hit the continental U.S.
Credit NOAA / Satellite and Information Service

 

We're now more than halfway through the Atlantic hurricane season and -- knock on wood -- no Atlantic hurricanes yet. Depending on how long this continues, 2013 stands a chance of setting a record for "Latest First Atlantic Hurricane" in history.

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Local History
2:44 pm
Wed September 4, 2013

How The Woman Behind Miami's Manhattan Cafe Witnessed The Downtown's Rebirth

Rosaly Guimaraes stands behind the counter of her Manhattan Cafe for the final time.

The year was 1995 and the place is on the cusp of a dilapidated downtown Miami at Northeast 14th Street and Biscayne Boulevard: parking lots located next to empty lots and patches of dusty grass that were home to those who had no other -- prostitutes, drug addicts, alcoholics and those who had simply given up.

It was back when the euphemism for Miami was South Florida, because like many a crime-ridden city, very few wanted to claim the name anymore.

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Environment
10:39 am
Wed September 4, 2013

Bald Eagles Are Back In A Big Way — And The Talons Are Out

Bryan Watts, a conservation biologist at the College of William and Mary, and biology graduate student Courtney Turrin, survey eagle behavior along the James River in late-summer.
Elizabeth Shogren NPR

Originally published on Wed September 4, 2013 8:48 pm

"It's a jungle if you're an eagle right now on the Chesapeake Bay," says Bryan Watts, a conservation biologist at the College of William and Mary in Williamsburg, Va. "You have to watch your back."

Americans have long imagined their national symbol as a solitary, noble bird soaring on majestic wings. The birds are indeed gorgeous and still soar, but the notion that they are loners is outdated, Watts and other conservationists are finding.

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Americas
4:04 pm
Tue September 3, 2013

Mexico Summons U.S. Ambassador, Seeking Answers To Spying Claims

New reports allege that the NSA spied on Mexican President Enrique Pena Nieto, seen here walking with President Barack Obama in June, when he was a candidate for office. Mexico and Brazil have demanded a response to charges of U.S. spying on their internal affairs.
Ben Stansall AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Tue September 3, 2013 3:14 pm

Allegations that U.S. agents spied on Mexico's President Enrique Pena Nieto when he was a candidate during last year's campaign have led Mexico to summon U.S. Ambassador Anthony Wayne and demanded "a thorough investigation."

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