NPR News

Pages

The Salt
2:38 pm
Tue July 2, 2013

'Heart Attack On A Hook': Meet America's 'Worst Restaurant Meal'

Long John Silver's Big Catch platter will net you 33 grams of trans fats in one meal.
Courtesy of Clare Politano Center for Science in the Public Interest

Originally published on Thu July 4, 2013 12:19 pm

Seafood is generally considered a more healthful choice when dining out — but not if you're battering and deep-frying it and serving it up with hush puppies and onion rings.

And that is precisely why the folks at the Center for Science in the Public Interest, a nutrition and health policy watchdog group, have named Long John Silver's new "Big Catch" meal the worst restaurant meal in America.

Read more
Book Reviews
2:36 pm
Tue July 2, 2013

American Mystery Finds A New Voice On 'The Bohemian Highway'

Novelist Sara Gran also writes for the HBO show Southland.
Deborah Lopez Houghton Mifflin

Originally published on Tue July 2, 2013 3:32 pm

It's been a while since I've heard a distinctive new American voice in mystery fiction: That Girl With the Dragon Tattoo dame seems to have put our homegrown hard-boiled detectives in the deep freeze. The mystery news of the past few years has chiefly come out of the Land of the Midnight Sun, dominated by the late Stieg Larsson and fellow Swedes Camilla Lackberg and Hakan Nesser, as well as Norwegians Anne Holt, Karin Fossum and Jo Nesbo.

Read more
Parallels
2:15 pm
Tue July 2, 2013

Who's Who In The Egyptian Crisis

Before The Fall: Then-Egyptian President Mohammed Morsi (right) met Monday with Prime Minister Hesham Kandil (center) and Defense Minister Gen. Abdel-Fattah al-Sisi in Cairo. Since then, the military has ousted Morsi, suspended the constitution and imposed a "road map" for political transition in Egypt after the president refused calls to step down.
Xinhua/Landov

Originally published on Wed July 3, 2013 5:46 pm

This story, which was originally posted on July 2, has been updated to reflect the events in Egypt today.

After days of growing protests across Egypt, the military has removed embattled President Mohammed Morsi and suspended the country's constitution, paving the way for an interim government ahead of early presidential elections.

Two years ago, during Egypt's 2011 revolution, the storyline was simple. A broad cross section of Egyptians took to the streets to demand the removal of Hosni Mubarak, the president who had been in power for three decades.

Read more
The Two-Way
1:42 pm
Tue July 2, 2013

His Son Is 'A Modern Day Paul Revere,' Snowden's Father Says

Declaring that "you are a modern day Paul Revere; summoning the American people to confront the growing danger of tyranny and one-branch government," the father of "NSA leaker" Edward Snowden on Tuesday released an open letter to his son.

Read more
The Two-Way
1:06 pm
Tue July 2, 2013

Baikonour, We Have A Problem. Russian Rocket Crashes And Burns

The spectacular crash.
YouTube.com

Originally published on Wed July 10, 2013 3:38 pm

Update at 3:25 p.m. ET on July 10.

Read more
The Two-Way
12:53 pm
Tue July 2, 2013

Why The Fort Hood Suspect Couldn't Plead Guilty To Murder

Maj. Nidal Hasan faces 13 charges of murder and 32 of attempted murder for the November 2009 shootings at Fort Hood. A Muslim, he has refused a judge's order to shave his beard, though it violates Army regulations. The trial will proceed, however.
Bell County Sheriff's Office Reuters/Landov

Originally published on Tue July 2, 2013 2:07 pm

(Updated at 1:15 p.m. ET.)

Nearly four years after the mass shooting at Fort Hood, Texas, in which 13 people were killed and 32 were wounded, the case against the Army psychiatrist who stands accused of the crimes got to the pleading stage Tuesday.

Read more
Remembrances
12:28 pm
Tue July 2, 2013

Remembering William Gray: A Mentor To Many

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

Finally today, we want to take a minute to say goodbye to an important figure in American politics and education. Former Congressman William Gray III died yesterday at the age of 71. Gray was a Democrat who represented Pennsylvania's 2nd District from 1979 to 1992. He was the first African-American to serve as majority whip in the U.S. House of Representatives.

Read more
Parenting
12:28 pm
Tue July 2, 2013

Avoiding The Post-Millennial Mid-Life Crisis

Originally published on Wed July 3, 2013 9:54 am

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

I'm Michel Martin and this is TELL ME MORE from NPR News. They say it takes a village to raise a child but maybe you just need a few moms and dads in your corner. Every week we check in with a diverse group of parents for their common sense and savvy advice. Today, as we broadcast from the Aspen Ideas Festival in Aspen, Colorado we decided to talk about new ideas about how young people can make the most of their 20s.

Read more
Afghanistan
12:28 pm
Tue July 2, 2013

Afghan Woman Fights For Women's Education

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

Now we'd like to bring you the story of one young woman for whom going to school was literally an act of courage. Shabana Basij-Rasikh was six when the Taliban took over in Afghanistan. They made it illegal for girls to go to school. As a result, for years, Shabana and her sister put their lives on the line to go to a secret school in Kabul. Her persistence and bravery eventually led her to Middlebury College, where she graduated magna cum laude in 2010.

Read more
Education
12:28 pm
Tue July 2, 2013

Hot Tips To Reinvent Education

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

This is TELL ME MORE from NPR News. I'm Michel Martin. Coming up, we will hear the story of one young woman who literally put her life on the line to go to school. Shabana Basij-Rasikh will join us to talk about growing up under Taliban rule in Afghanistan and the work she's doing now to make sure other young Afghan women can get an education. That's in just a few minutes. But first, we are continuing our conversation with our education innovators.

Read more
Education
12:28 pm
Tue July 2, 2013

Educational Innovators Ask 'Why Can't Learning Be Fun?'

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

Read more
Shots - Health News
12:20 pm
Tue July 2, 2013

Federal Rule Extends Subsidies For College Students

Students at Yale University and several other schools that are self-insured will qualify for subsidies under the federal health law after all.
Christopher Capozziello Getty Images

Beginning in 2014, most people, including students, will have to have health insurance, whether or not they are claimed as a dependent on their parents' tax returns.

The federal health law says if they don't, they or their parents will face penalties.

While expansion of coverage under the health law has helped about 3 million young people get insurance through their parents' plans, many remain uninsured or have coverage through student health plans.

Read more
World
12:12 pm
Tue July 2, 2013

Nelson Mandela's Prison Adventures

Near the end of his 27 years in prison, Nelson Mandela was taken to secret meetings with government officials and for drives around Cape Town. Here, he returned to his Robben Island prison cell for a visit in 1994, shortly before he became South Africa's first black president.
Louise Gubb Corbis

Originally published on Thu December 5, 2013 7:15 pm

On Christmas Eve 1986, a South Africa prison commander responsible for watching over Nelson Mandela casually asked the world's most famous prisoner, "Mandela, would you like to see the city?"

Mandela was completely surprised, but agreed. The prison commander, Lt. Col. Gawie Marx, promptly put Mandela in his car for a leisurely drive around Cape Town, one of the world's most scenic cities.

Read more
Classroom Contemplations
12:09 pm
Tue July 2, 2013

Why Relying On Tests Only Reinforces Bad Behavior In Schools

Originally published on Thu June 27, 2013 10:00 am

There are some real perils to systems which try to reduce teacher performance to a single number, such as many of our new “value-added” formulas.

The first is that whatever you decide to measure — and, implicitly or explicitly reward — is what you are going to get.

Read more
It's All Politics
12:03 pm
Tue July 2, 2013

Democrats Face The Two States Of Texas: Urban And Rural

Texas is beginning to trend urban (downtown Houston, left), which could be good news for Democrats, who tend not to do well in rural areas like Wise County near Boyd (right).
David J. Phillip (left)/LM Otero (right) AP

Originally published on Tue July 2, 2013 2:32 pm

All this week, NPR is taking a look at the demographic changes that could reshape the political landscape in Texas over the next decade — and what that could mean for the rest of the country.

Read more

Pages