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The Salt
12:04 pm
Tue June 10, 2014

The Salad Frontier: Why Astronauts Need To Grow Lettuce In Space

Astronaut Steve "Swanny" Swanson tends to lettuce plants growing at the International Space Station that may one day make it into his salad.
Courtesy of NASA

Originally published on Tue June 10, 2014 3:14 pm

Have you ever craved a salad, I mean really craved a salad because you've been eating a lot of freeze-dried meat and beans?

Astronauts who spend months on end in space sure do miss their greens. That's why NASA is embarking on a program to get astronauts growing their own food. First stop is the International Space Station and a vegetable production system called Veg-01, or "Veggie."

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Shots - Health News
11:43 am
Tue June 10, 2014

Giving School Nurses Access To Medical Records Improves Care

Originally published on Tue June 10, 2014 1:17 pm

School nurses today do a lot more than bandage skinned knees. They administer vaccines and medications, help diabetic students monitor their blood sugar, and prepare teachers to handle a student's seizure or asthma attack, among many other things.

"Chronic disease management is what school nurses spend most of their time doing," says Carolyn Duff, president of the National Association of School Nurses. "We do care for students in emergencies, but we spend more time planning to avoid emergencies."

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Shots - Health News
11:17 am
Tue June 10, 2014

From Genes To Fangs: Snake Venom Recipes Remain Mysterious

Saw-scaled vipers may be small, but they pack a nasty venomous punch. This one, Echis carinatus sochureki, was used in a study on snake venom.
Courtesy of Wolfgang Wüster

Originally published on Wed June 11, 2014 8:46 am

When a saw-scaled viper sinks its fangs into a person, it isn't pretty.

Toxins attack the victim's capillaries. The body launches an immune defense, as it would with an infection. But that takes time — too much time. The venom quickly dissolves the tiny blood vessels, and the body runs out of clotting materials before it can repair them.

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Parallels
11:11 am
Tue June 10, 2014

Western Countries Issue Warnings; Kenyan Tourism Gets Pummeled

Two customers sit having a drink in the Diani Sea resort in Diani, Kenya, outside Mombasa, on May 16. Travel advisories issued by Western countries are hitting Mombasa hard, forcing hotel closures and thousands of workers to lose their jobs.
Ivan Lieman AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Thu June 12, 2014 7:43 pm

The Baobab Resort sits on the south coast of Kenya's Mombasa Island, but it has some of the homey feel of an old Catskills resort.

On a recent day, sounds from outside trickled into the resort's largest conference hall: children enjoying their last hour of daylight on the beach, staff members singing tunes from The Lion King, warming up for their evening show.

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The Two-Way
10:59 am
Tue June 10, 2014

With Concern For Environment, Illinois Bans Microbeads

Researcher Sherri Mason looks for microbeads in a water sample from Lake Michigan.
Cheryl Corley

Originally published on Tue June 10, 2014 1:27 pm

Illinois became the first state in the union to ban microbeads, the tiny bits of plastic found in consumer products like skin exfoliants and soap.

As NPR's Cheryl Corley reports, environmentalists say that when microbeads wash down the drain, they're usually missed by filtration systems, which means they become food to fish and other wildlife.

Cheryl filed this report for our Newscast unit:

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The Two-Way
10:14 am
Tue June 10, 2014

Drones Approved: FAA Gives OK To First Commercial Use Over Land

A 2011 photo shows an AeroVironment Puma drone being prepared for launch by University of Alaska researchers. The FAA says it approved BP's use of the drone to survey oil fields in Alaska.
Keith Cunningham AP

Originally published on Tue June 10, 2014 1:24 pm

The Federal Aviation Administration says it has issued the first permit in its history for an unmanned aircraft to fly over U.S. soil. Oil company BP will use a drone from the company AeroVironment to conduct surveys in Alaska.

The first drone flights under the recently issued waiver have already taken place, the FAA says.

From the agency's news release:

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The Two-Way
9:50 am
Tue June 10, 2014

Insurgent Group Claims Large Part Of Major Iraqi City

Armed Iraqi soldiers take their positions during clashes with militants in the northern city of Mosul, Iraq.
Uncredited AP

Originally published on Tue June 10, 2014 7:46 pm

Overnight in Iraq, the al-Qaida splinter group ISIS overtook large parts of Mosul, one of the country's most populous cities. According to various media reports, insurgents overran government buildings, TV stations and military bases, forcing Iraqi soldiers and police to apparently flee their posts.

While the Islamic State of Iraq and Syria is responsible for most of the violent attacks in Iraq, analysts say this one is significant.

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The Two-Way
7:56 am
Tue June 10, 2014

Gunmen Stage Second Assault Near Karachi Airport

Pakistan Airport Security Force personnel were on alert Tuesday after shots were fired near a checkpoint in Karachi.
Asif Hassan AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Tue June 10, 2014 11:09 am

A short-lived attack near Karachi's airport today interrupted prayers for security officers who died in Sunday's violence at the facility. The attackers fled after firing shots near the Airport Security Force training facility, causing flights to be halted temporarily.

"3 to 4 terrorists fired near ASF Camp, ran away," reads a tweet from Army spokesman Major Gen. Asim Bajwa. "No breach of fence, no entry. Chase is on, situation under control."

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Europe
7:53 am
Tue June 10, 2014

Love Locks Weigh Paris Bridge Down

Originally published on Tue June 10, 2014 8:23 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

Good morning, I'm Renee Montagne. Happy couples have attached one too many love locks to a popular bridge in Paris. The bridge closed last night after part of it crumbled under the weight of thousands of padlocks, hooked there to symbolize endless love. Thousands of Parisians have signed a petition to remove all those locks, but this morning the bridge reopened to pedestrians. So Paris remains locked in battle over a lover's tradition for a little while longer. It's MORNING EDITION. Transcript provided by NPR, Copyright NPR.

Around the Nation
7:50 am
Tue June 10, 2014

We Said 'Tie', Listeners Told Us We Were Wrong

Originally published on Tue June 10, 2014 8:23 am

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

Good morning. I'm David Greene. Yesterday we reported on the U.S. men's soccer team as it heads to Brazil for the World Cup. Shortly afterwards, a scolding tweet came in over a misuse of some sports language. Soccer matches, we were told, don't tie, they draw. You also don't say two goals to nothing - it's two to nil. Like this...

(SOUNDBITE OF ARCHIVED RECORDING)

UNIDENTIFIED ANNOUNCER: Manchester United now they are stopped by two goals to nil.

The Two-Way
7:00 am
Tue June 10, 2014

Possible Friendly-Fire Incident Kills 5 Americans In Afghanistan

Originally published on Tue June 10, 2014 2:57 pm

Five U.S. service members died in southern Afghanistan in a possible case of friendly fire. Afghan media are citing a local official who says the troops' air support mistakenly bombed their position. The attack is still under investigation.

Update at 2:45 p.m. ET: More From Pentagon

"We have reason to suspect that friendly fire was the cause here, specifically from the air," Pentagon spokesman Rear Adm. John Kirby said without elaborating.

"This is a tragic incident all around and our thoughts and prayers go out to the families," Kirby said.

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It's All Politics
5:53 am
Tue June 10, 2014

Hillary Clinton: I Helped Restore U.S. Leadership In The World

Former Secretary of State Hillary Clinton addresses the American Jewish Committee Global Forum in Washington in May 2014.
Cliff Owen AP

Originally published on Tue June 10, 2014 9:26 am

To hear Hillary Clinton, the former secretary of state and once and maybe future Democratic presidential candidate tell it, her new book, Hard Choices, isn't the kickoff to a 2016 campaign.

She still hasn't made up her mind about another run for the presidency, she told Renee Montagne, co-host of NPR's Morning Edition. It's more a review of the decisions she made as the nation's top diplomat.

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Politics
5:50 am
Tue June 10, 2014

Clinton Sought 'Tougher Deal,' But Won't Second-Guess Bergdahl Swap

Originally published on Wed June 11, 2014 2:38 pm

Below are excerpts from Hillary Clinton's interview Monday with NPR's Renee Montagne. Clinton's new book, Hard Choices, will be published Tuesday.

Portions of this interview will air on Morning Edition.

On running for president in 2016

HILLARY CLINTON: I have made some hard choices, and I face some hard choices. And, as I say in the book, I have not made a decision yet. ...

RENEE MONTAGNE: This is, may I say, a classic campaign book. ...

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NPR Story
5:39 am
Tue June 10, 2014

Supreme Court Rules BP Must Keep Paying For Spill

Originally published on Tue June 10, 2014 12:30 pm

Under a legal settlement, BP has been sending money to businesses affected by the 2010 Gulf of Mexico spill. The company said the terms of the settlement are being misinterpreted. The court disagreed.

Asia
5:37 am
Tue June 10, 2014

Taliban Claim Credit For Another Attack In Karachi

Originally published on Tue June 10, 2014 12:25 pm

Militants are attacking a security training facility near the Karachi airport. The incident comes less than two days after a deadly attack on the Karachi airport itself.

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