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Parallels
2:38 pm
Tue May 27, 2014

World's Richest People Meet, Muse On How To Spread The Wealth

Prince Charles talks to Lynn Forester de Rothschild (left), organizer of the Conference on Inclusive Capitalism, and Christine Lagarde, head of the International Monetary Fund, before Tuesday's conference. The 250 corporate and financial leaders who attended control some $30 trillion, about a third of the world's investable assets.
WPA Pool Getty Images

Originally published on Tue May 27, 2014 8:17 pm

Talk of economic mobility and the wealth gap is hardly new. From the Occupy movement to President Obama's re-election campaign, income inequality has been in the spotlight for years.

Even so, the "inclusive capitalism" conference in London on Tuesday broke new ground. Not because of the conversation, but because of the people having it.

The 250 people from around the world invited to attend this one-day conference do not represent "the 99 percent," or even the 1 percent. It's more like a tiny fraction of the 1 percent.

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The Two-Way
2:36 pm
Tue May 27, 2014

Bill Murray Offers Bachelor Party Advice On Love And Life

Originally published on Tue May 27, 2014 5:45 pm

Bill Murray dropped by a bachelor party in South Carolina this past weekend and offered up some advice.

"You know how funerals are not for the dead, they're for the living?" the comic actor says in a video posted by Deadspin. "Bachelor parties are not for the groom; they're for the unmarried."

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The Two-Way
2:14 pm
Tue May 27, 2014

Pakistani Woman Stoned To Death By Family Outside Courtroom

Mohammad Iqbal, husband of Farzana, sits in an ambulance next to the body of his pregnant wife, who was stoned to death by her own family in Lahore, Pakistan, on Tuesday.
K.M. Chaudary AP

Originally published on Tue May 27, 2014 3:26 pm

A 25-year-old pregnant woman has been stoned to death by her relatives outside a courtroom in Lahore, Pakistan — a so-called honor killing meant to punish her for marrying against her family's will.

Farzana Iqbal was preparing to testify in defense of her husband, Mohammad Iqbal, whom her father had accused of kidnapping the young woman. The father had insisted instead that she marry her cousin.

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Shots - Health News
1:36 pm
Tue May 27, 2014

When Older People Walk Now, They Stay Independent Later

Walking: so simple, yet difficult for many people as they age.
Justin Horrocks iStockphoto

Originally published on Wed May 28, 2014 11:19 am

Millions of older people have trouble walking a quarter of a mile, which puts them at high risk of losing their mobility, being hospitalized or dying.

But it's hard to get people who are already sedentary to become more active and stay that way.

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The Two-Way
1:27 pm
Tue May 27, 2014

Former LulzSec Hacker Turned Informant Avoids Further Jail Time

Hector Xavier Monsegur arrives at court in New York for a sentencing hearing on Tuesday.
Seth Wenig AP

Originally published on Thu June 5, 2014 2:28 pm

Avoiding further jail time, Hector Xavier Monsegur — a hacktivist legend — walked out of a federal court house in Manhattan on Tuesday.

The AP reports that U.S. District Judge Loretta Preska said Monsegur's cooperation helped disrupt hundreds of cyber attacks and helped disrupt the hacker activist group Anonymous and essentially marked the end of LulzSec.

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The Two-Way
1:21 pm
Tue May 27, 2014

Median CEO Pay Tops $10 Million For The First Time

Are you getting rich off the rising stock market? America's CEOs are.

Median compensation for the chief executive of a Standard & Poor's 500 company was $10.8 million last year, according to a study by The Associated Press.

That represents an 8.8 percent increase over 2012 and marks the first time that median compensation crossed the eight-figure mark.

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The Two-Way
11:44 am
Tue May 27, 2014

Florida's IQ Limit For Death Penalty Isn't Constitutional, Supreme Court Says

Florida death row inmate Freddie Lee Hall challenged the state's use of an IQ cutoff to determine mental disability. The Supreme Court sided with him on Tuesday, saying Florida's law doesn't take standard errors of measurement into account.
Florida Department of Corrections/AP

Originally published on Tue May 27, 2014 4:53 pm

A Florida law that sets an IQ test score of 70 as a minimum in determining who's eligible for the death penalty is unconstitutional, the Supreme Court says. In a reversal of a state court's decision, the justices say Florida's rule ignores norms in the psychiatric profession. The opinion also cites the Eighth Amendment, which bars cruel and unusual punishment.

"Florida set a hard-line rule that the death penalty could not be imposed on convicted felons whose IQ is 70 or below," NPR's Washington desk says in its summary of the case.

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Parenting
11:44 am
Tue May 27, 2014

New York City's First Lady A Bad Mom ... Or Just An Honest One?

Originally published on Tue May 27, 2014 12:32 pm

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

I'm Michel Martin, and this is TELL ME MORE from NPR News. They say it takes a village to raise a child, but maybe you just need a few moms and dads in your corner. Every week we check in with a diverse group of parents for their common sense and savvy advice.

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Around the Nation
11:44 am
Tue May 27, 2014

Making Playtime A Priority In America's Cities

Originally published on Tue May 27, 2014 12:32 pm

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

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Religion
11:44 am
Tue May 27, 2014

How Much Clout Does Pope Francis Have In The Middle East?

Originally published on Tue May 27, 2014 12:32 pm

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

This is TELL ME MORE from NPR news on Michel Martin. It was a holiday weekend for millions of Americans but on the other side of the world Pope Francis was on a mission. He visited the Middle East to add his voice and presence to efforts to achieve peace and reconciliation. We wanted to know more about this visit so we called a person whose voice will be familiar to you. Sylvia Poggioli, NPR's senior European correspondent. Sylvia welcome back thank so much for joining us once again.

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The Two-Way
11:35 am
Tue May 27, 2014

Obama Plans To Leave Residual Force Of 9,800 In Afghanistan

Sgt. Kyle Gonzales, a sniper with the 82nd Airborne, has a cigarette after a gun battle near the village of Babaker, Giro district, Ghazni province. The soldiers have engaged in gun battles every time they push into the hamlets north of their forward operating base.
David Gilkey NPR

Originally published on Tue May 27, 2014 5:31 pm

(This post was last updated at 3:00 p.m. ET.)

President Obama announced on Tuesday a plan to leave a residual force of 9,800 service members in Afghanistan beyond 2014. By 2016, most troops will be out of the country.

"It's time to turn the page on more than a decade in which so much of our foreign policy was focused on... wars in Afghanistan and Iraq," Obama said in the White House Rose Garden.

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The Protojournalist
11:13 am
Tue May 27, 2014

Art In A Jar 2: Details, Details

Jim Tuttle NPR

Originally published on Mon June 2, 2014 11:17 am

When we posted the first Art in a Jar in April, we learned a couple of lessons: 1) Folks liked the idea. 2) The puzzle was way too easy.

So we try, try again.

The Puzzle

The challenge: Guess the masterpiece — by looking at its pieces — in the jar.

Please post your guesses in the comments section.

The Expert

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The Two-Way
10:52 am
Tue May 27, 2014

Supreme Court Rules In Favor Of Secret Service In Free Speech Case

A 2004 case involving the Secret Service made its way to the Supreme Court on Wednesday. Demonstrators wanted to sue for being moved away from then-President George W. Bush.
Charles Dharapak AP

Originally published on Tue May 27, 2014 5:21 pm

The Supreme Court on Tuesday ruled in a favor of Secret Service agents in a free speech case involving President George W. Bush.

The case is this: During Bush's campaign for a second term, he showed up at a restaurant in Jacksonville, Ore. Anti-Bush protesters as well as supporters showed up. Fifteen minutes after Bush decided to sit in the patio of the restaurant, the Secret Service asked police to move the anti-Bush protesters away from the restaurant and out of sight of the president.

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Shots - Health News
10:50 am
Tue May 27, 2014

States Consider Using Medicaid To Pay College Health Plan Premiums

Cornell University in Ithaca, N.Y., says having Medicaid pay for some students' coverage through the school health plan will give those students better options.
Alex/Flickr

Some students headed to college this fall will get top-drawer health coverage at little or no cost.

How? Medicaid, it turns out, will pay the premium for the student health plan.

Proponents say students who are eligible for Medicaid, the health insurance program for low-income people, get access to a wider network of doctors and hospitals by getting coverage through the college health plans. These broad networks can be an important consideration for students who travel for internships, international study or who return to homes far from school during the summer.

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Parallels
10:20 am
Tue May 27, 2014

With A Heavy Hand, Chinese Authorities Crack Down On Mourners

Chinese mourners placed flowers and lit candles at the scene of an attack last week that killed 39 people in the northwestern Chinese city of Urumqi. When people used social media to call for a protest, authorities tried to break up the gathering.
Frank Langfitt NPR

Originally published on Tue May 27, 2014 4:31 pm

When people turn out to mourn the loss of loved ones, local authorities in most places treat them with respect. Not in the northwestern Chinese city of Urumqi last week, where 39 people were killed in a terrorist attack the government attributed to Uighers, a mostly Muslim ethnic minority.

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