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Middle East
8:16 am
Sat September 8, 2012

Inside Security Council Talks On Syria

Transcript

SCOTT SIMON, HOST:

Last week, the French ended their rotation at the head of United Nations Security Council. Their permanent representative, Ambassador Gerard Araud, had one preeminently difficult issue on his agenda while in charge. And, of course, that was the question of what to do about Syria. Ambassador Araud joins us from his office in New York City. Mr. Ambassador, thanks very much for being with us.

AMBASSADOR GERARD ARAUD: Good morning.

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Around the Nation
8:16 am
Sat September 8, 2012

Gamblers Win Big In Atlantic City With Unshuffled Decks

Transcript

SCOTT SIMON, HOST:

A case of unshuffled card decks has riled up casino owners and players in Atlantic City, New Jersey. Fourteen gamblers at the Golden Nugget there raked in more than $1.5 million playing a game called mini-baccarat in April. But they didn't have Lady Luck to thank so much as a technical malfunction. The players realized after a few hands that they were being dealt cards in the exact same sequence.

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U.S.
8:16 am
Sat September 8, 2012

The 'Skills Missmatch': Failing To Meet Job Demand

Transcript

SCOTT SIMON, HOST:

This is WEEKEND EDITION from NPR News. I'm Scott Simon. More dismal economic news this week. The U.S. economy created slightly fewer than 100,000 new jobs - worse than what many economists expected and what millions of Americans had hoped for. The unemployment rate dropped slightly, but possibly because half a million Americans just gave up and stopped looking for work. NPR's Steve Henn reports on whether the jobs lost during the great recession will ever come back.

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World
8:16 am
Sat September 8, 2012

Haqqani Designation Complicates Pakistan Relations

Transcript

(SOUNDBITE OF MUSIC)

SCOTT SIMON, HOST:

After long deliberations, the U.S. State Department has designated one of Afghanistan's deadliest insurgent groups to be a terrorist organization. The Haqqani network has been blamed for many attacks on U.S. troops and the embassy in Afghanistan. Although the group is made up primarily of Afghan fighters, it is based in northwest Pakistan.

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Presidential Race
8:16 am
Sat September 8, 2012

Will Convention Give Obama A Boost In N.C.?

Transcript

SCOTT SIMON, HOST:

This is WEEKEND EDITION from NPR News. I'm Scott Simon. Democrats in North Carolina are hoping to extend the momentum of the convention, organizing to get out the vote in November. President Obama narrowly won the state four years ago, but recent polls have shown Mitt Romney now ahead. The weak economy still looms over their organizing efforts. NPR's Brian Naylor reports.

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Health
8:16 am
Sat September 8, 2012

What To Do In Case Of A Zombie Apocalypse

Transcript

SCOTT SIMON, HOST:

Now to an odd potential problem here.

(SOUNDBITE OF THEME FROM "THE WALKING DEAD")

SIMON: The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention is urging all Americans to...

UNIDENTIFIED MAN: Prepare for the zombie apocalypse.

SIMON: At least a zombie visit. They even put a to-do list on their "Public Health Matters" blog. The guidelines don't much resemble the rules of survival in the movie "Zombieland."

(SOUNDBITE OF THE MOVIE, "ZOMBIELAND")

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Around the Nation
6:06 am
Sat September 8, 2012

Looking To 'Future,' Ga. Schools Require Mandarin

Instructor Huiling Li encourages second-grader Trinity Faulkner on the first day of Mandarin Chinese classes at Brookdale Elementary School in Macon, Ga.
Adam Ragusea for NPR

Originally published on Mon September 10, 2012 11:57 am

Public schools in Macon, Ga., and surrounding Bibb County have a lot of problems. Most of the 25,000 students are poor enough to qualify for free and reduced lunch, and about half don't graduate.

Bibb County's Haitian-born superintendent Romain Dallemand came into the job last year with a bag of changes he calls "The Macon Miracle." There are now longer schools days, year-round instruction, and one mandate nobody saw coming: Mandarin Chinese for every student, pre-K through 12th grade.

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Latin America
6:03 am
Sat September 8, 2012

Plan For Cuban Ballet School A Dance Of Art, Politics

Cuban ballet dancer Carlos Acosta has a bold plan to transform a long-abandoned, incompletely built ballet school in Havana into a global cultural and dance center. But some fear the plan is a step toward "privatization."
Nick Miroff for NPR

Originally published on Sat September 8, 2012 9:39 pm

A radical proposal to restore one of Cuba's most important architectural landmarks is rekindling a 50-year-old controversy. At the center is ballet superstar Carlos Acosta, who left the island and went on to a lead role in London's Royal Ballet. Acosta wants to return to the island and restore an abandoned ballet school with help from one of the world's most famous architects.

But the proposal has opened old wounds from the school's past and stirred a debate about the future of Cuba's state-sponsored cultural model.

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Politics
5:59 am
Sat September 8, 2012

As Election Nears, Keeping Donors A Secret Is Trickier

iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Sun September 9, 2012 5:32 pm

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Around the Nation
5:58 am
Sat September 8, 2012

Forget The Heels: What It Takes To Be Miss Navajo

Miss Navajo contestants must work in teams to butcher sheep. From left, Wallitta Begay, Leandra "Abby" Thomas and Charlene Goodluck had to cut the sheep's throat, remove the stomach and quarter the carcass.
Laurel Morales for NPR

Originally published on Sat September 8, 2012 12:41 pm

The Miss Navajo contest is not your typical beauty pageant. Instead of swimsuits and high heels, you get turquoise and moccasins. One of the talent competitions is butchering sheep, and speaking Navajo is a must.

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The Two-Way
7:20 pm
Fri September 7, 2012

Wikipedia Irks Philip Roth With Reluctance To Edit Entry About His Novel

Author Philip Roth resorted to an open letter to Wikipedia when his efforts to correct an error on the site were rebuffed. The entry in question was about his book, The Human Stain.
AFP Getty Images

Originally published on Fri September 7, 2012 8:24 pm

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The Two-Way
6:18 pm
Fri September 7, 2012

Armless Archer Matt Stutzman Describes How He Shoots A Bow — And Wins Medals

Archer Matt Stutzman of the U.S. prepares to shoot in the London Paralympics. Born without arms, Stutzman uses a release trigger strapped to his shoulder to fire.
Dennis Grombkowski Getty Images

American Paralympian Matt Stutzman won the silver medal in archery this week, a feat he accomplished despite being born without arms. In the men's compound open final, he was narrowly beaten by Finland's Jere Forsberg, who has the use of both arms.

In the gold medal match, Forsberg fired a perfect 10 on his final arrow to avoid a shoot-off with Stutzman.

The Paralympics have helped Stutzman, who is from Fairfield, Iowa, become something of a celebrity, thanks to his competitive spirit and his refusal to let his talents go to waste.

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The Salt
4:46 pm
Fri September 7, 2012

Want To Control Your Alcohol Intake? Ask For A Different Glass

Question: Which one of these glasses contains the most liquid? Answer: None. Each of them contains 4 oz. of iced tea.
Gretchen Cuda Kroen NPR

Originally published on Wed September 19, 2012 4:10 pm

Downed a few too many drinks at the office happy hour? The shape of the glass may be at fault — at least in part — for encouraging drinkers to overindulge. The reason, scientists say, is simple: A curved glass interferes with the ability to judge alcohol intake.

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Shots - Health Blog
4:40 pm
Fri September 7, 2012

How Broken Is The U.S. Health Care System? Let's Count The Ways

Complaints about disorganized health care are rampant.
IOM

Originally published on Tue September 11, 2012 12:29 pm

Just about everybody who's ever needed health care in this country has seen firsthand the problems that make our system inefficient, costly and often downright unsatisfying.

The nonpartisan Institute of Medicine just put out a 450-page report about the problems along with some ideas for improvements.

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The Two-Way
4:21 pm
Fri September 7, 2012

Texas Road Will Inaugurate 85 MPH Speed Limit, Nation's Highest

Originally published on Fri September 7, 2012 6:18 pm

The highest speed limit in America will be officially unveiled in November, when drivers on one portion of a Texas highway will be allowed to reach 85 mph without keeping an eye out for police cars and speed cameras.

As Transportation Nation reports, the new speed limit allows drivers to "legally drive faster than hurricane force winds."

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