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7:44 am
Tue May 20, 2014

The Secret Players In The Russia-Ukraine Game

Chechen President Ramzan Kadyrov on Instagram.
Instagram

Originally published on Tue May 20, 2014 11:30 am

Keeping up with the battle in Ukraine? Then you must know of a man named Ramzan Kadyrov. No? Well, that's because he's the Instagram dictator staying in the background, behind the curtain, asking people to pay no mind to the Chechen military fighters he might be ordering over to fight for Russia.

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The Two-Way
7:20 am
Tue May 20, 2014

In China, Anger At U.S. Hacking Charges — And Claims Of Hypocrisy

The building housing China's Unit 61398, a division of the army linked to hacking operations, is seen in Shanghai last year. The U.S. says the group worked to steal trade secrets from American companies.
AP

Originally published on Tue May 20, 2014 2:07 pm

China says U.S. charges against five Chinese military officials for allegedly hacking into American computers amount to hypocrisy, citing U.S. surveillance and wiretapping. The country's foreign ministry summoned the American ambassador Monday night to complain about the charges.

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Europe
7:09 am
Tue May 20, 2014

EU Tries A Rap Battle To Encourage Young People To Vote

Originally published on Tue May 20, 2014 11:43 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

Yo, yo, listen up. I'm Renee Montagne. The European Union recently held rap battle to try to engage young voters in this week's parliamentary election, most of whom don't make it to the polls. The rap battle featured members of the Parliament amid dueling emcees like DeKay.

(SOUNDBITE OF RAP BATTLE)

DEKAY: (singing) Yeah, so make a change in how you living. If you could vote for "X Factor" why not vote for politicians?

Code Switch
7:03 am
Tue May 20, 2014

Ah, Commencement. Caps, Gowns And Mispronounced Names

For college grads all over the country, receiving their diploma can feel a lot like one of those trips to Starbucks where customers' names get mangled.
iStockphoto

Originally published on Tue May 20, 2014 8:10 pm

Last Friday on All Things Considered, NPR's Ted Robbins brought us a college commencement story the likes of which we hadn't heard before: the minefield that awaits the ceremony announcer when he or she is handed a list of students' names.

A list that said speaker must then read aloud.

In front of thousands of eager, excited, tuition-paying parents.

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Research News
7:01 am
Tue May 20, 2014

Gluten Researcher Reverses His Earlier Finding

Originally published on Tue May 20, 2014 11:43 am

A 2011 study found gluten can cause gastrointestinal distress even in people who don't suffer from celiac disease. Peter Gibson published that study, and in a new paper he says the opposite is true.

The Salt
6:59 am
Tue May 20, 2014

'Third Plate' Reimagines Farm-To-Table Eating To Nourish The Land

A view of Dan Barber's Stone Barns Center field and barns in Pocantico Hills, N.Y.
Nicole Franzen Courtesy of Blue Hill Farm

Originally published on Fri May 23, 2014 5:56 pm

Perched on a farm along the Hudson River is Dan Barber's award-winning restaurant, Blue Hill at Stone Barns. The food that's harvested on the farm year-round is what is served to diners daily.

But this champion of the farm-to-table movement noticed that farming and consuming foods locally still wasn't all that sustainable.

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Guilty And Charged
6:17 am
Tue May 20, 2014

Unpaid Court Fees Land The Poor In 21st Century Debtors' Prisons

Originally published on Tue May 20, 2014 11:43 am

Debtors' prisons were outlawed in the United States back before the Civil War. But an NPR state-by-state survey found that people still get sent to jail for unpaid court fines and fees.

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Europe
6:00 am
Tue May 20, 2014

Europe Steps Up Attacks Against Google

Originally published on Tue May 20, 2014 11:43 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

And in Europe, Google is under increasing attack. A consortium of European digital companies has brought charges against the American Internet search giant for behaving like a monopoly. A ruling by the European Court of Justice could force Google to remove certain Web links from its search engine.

NPR's Eleanor Beardsley sends this report from Paris.

UNIDENTIFIED MAN: (French spoken)

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Latin America
5:16 am
Tue May 20, 2014

Bolivia's President Signs To Play Professional Soccer

Originally published on Tue May 20, 2014 11:43 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

Good morning, I'm Renee Montagne.

In soccer-mad countries there is one job even more desirable than head of state. And now Bolivia's president has reached that goal. Evo Morales signed on to play professional soccer. The Sports Boys club has assigned him a jersey and says he will actually play. A publicity stunt, of course, but Morales has played before. In 2010, he made headlines against a team of political rivals when he kneed an opposing player in the groin.

NPR Story
5:09 am
Tue May 20, 2014

Military Declares Martial Law In Thailand

Originally published on Tue May 20, 2014 11:43 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

In a surprise move, Thailand's army declared martial law today. For six months there's been a standoff between the government and its opposition that worsened last week after the prime minister was removed from office by Thailand's constitutional court. The Thai military says this is not a coup, insisting the move is meant to prevent violent clashes between the two sides. To learn more we're joined by reporter Michael Sullivan in Bangkok. And, Michael, the army has imposed martial law. What does Bangkok look like today?

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Around the Nation
5:09 am
Tue May 20, 2014

Despite A History Of Twisters, Moore, Okla., Keeps Growing

Max Alvarez (left) and Hollan Corliss construct a new home in Moore, Okla., to replace one that was destroyed in May 2013. More than 300 new homes have been built since the tornado, in addition to the 1,100 that are being rebuilt.
Joe Raedle Getty Images

Originally published on Tue May 20, 2014 12:08 pm

One year ago Tuesday, a violent tornado obliterated the city of Moore, Okla., killing 24 residents and leaving nearly 400 injured among the razed homes and businesses. It was the third violent tornado to strike the city in the past 15 years. But rather than move away, residents have stayed put in Moore — and more and more are actually moving here.

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NPR Story
5:09 am
Tue May 20, 2014

U.S. Files Charges Against Chinese Officials Over Cyberspying

Originally published on Tue May 20, 2014 11:43 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

This is MORNING EDITION from NPR News. I'm Renee Montagne.

It was an extraordinary moment yesterday when the U.S. indicted members of China's military, charging them with stealing commercial secrets from American companies. The Department of Justice even displayed classic wanted posters with their photos, posters now displayed prominently on the FBI website.

To find out how this is playing out in China, we turned to NPR's Shanghai correspondent, Frank Langfitt. Good morning.

FRANK LANGFITT, BYLINE: Good morning, Renee.

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Middle East
3:33 am
Tue May 20, 2014

Pope To Travel To Holy Land With Rabbi And Muslim Leader

A Palestinian man works on a banner bearing a portrait of Pope Francis at a printing house in the West Bank city of Ramallah in anticipation of this week's papal visit.
Abbas Momani AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Tue May 20, 2014 4:24 pm

The first non-European pope in modern history will makes a pilgrimage to the Holy Land this week, a region with centuries of religious strife.

Francis — the first pope to take the name of the saint of peace — will carry far less historical baggage than any of his predecessors.

When John Paul II visited Israel in 2000, he prayed at the Western Wall and apologized for the church's sins against Jews. Nine years later, at Yad Vashem, the memorial to the Holocaust, Benedict XVI urged that the names of the victims never perish, be denied or forgotten.

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Code Switch
3:31 am
Tue May 20, 2014

Oklahoma's Latino Community Prepares For The Next Tornado

Gloria and Francisco Sanchez stand in front of their new ranch house, still under construction a year after a tornado destroyed their last home in Moore, Okla.
Hansi Lo Wang NPR

Originally published on Tue May 20, 2014 11:43 am

A devastating EF-5 tornado ripped through Moore, Okla., a year ago Tuesday. Just 11 days later, another twister ravaged the Oklahoma City metro area.

Nine of the 23 people who died as a result of the second storm were members of the local Latino community. Their deaths have sparked efforts to better prepare Hispanic families for storms.

On a windy afternoon in Oklahoma City, American Red Cross volunteer Ivelisse Cruz hands out stickers to families at the Children's Day Festival.

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The Two-Way
7:48 pm
Mon May 19, 2014

Thai Army Declares Martial Law But Says It's No Coup

Commander-in-Chief of the Royal Thai Army Gen. Prayuth Chan-ocha (front) during a military parade in January. The army has declared martial law amid months of political unrest.
Apichart Weerawong AP

Originally published on Mon May 19, 2014 8:28 pm

Thailand's army has declared martial law less than two weeks after Prime Minister Yingluck Shinawatra was thrown out of office by the country's Constitutional Court.

The Associated Press reports:

"The army said in a statement that it had taken the action to 'keep peace and order,' and soldiers entered several private television stations that are sympathetic to protesters.

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