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4:57 am
Mon May 19, 2014

GOP Candidates Try To Hold Off Tea Party Picks In Primaries

Originally published on Tue May 20, 2014 7:46 am

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

OK, so that's the governor's race in Pennsylvania; a battle among Democrats. The other races we'll be watching closely tomorrow are mainly those among Republicans who want to serve in the Senate, and they are hoping it is a Senate with a GOP majority.

To walk us through some of these races, we're joined as we are most Mondays by Cokie Roberts. Cokie, good morning.

COKIE ROBERTS, BYLINE: Hi, David.

GREENE: And here in the studio with me is NPR senior Washington editor Ron Elving. Ron, good morning to you.

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It's All Politics
3:27 am
Mon May 19, 2014

Pa. Democrats Aim For Spot To Challenge GOP Governor

Businessman Tom Wolf talks to U.S. Rep. Allyson Schwartz before the Pennsylvania Democratic Gubernatorial Primary Debate last week in Philadelphia.
Michael Perez AP

Originally published on Tue May 20, 2014 7:46 am

Pennsylvania is among six states holding primary elections Tuesday. Gov. Tom Corbett is unchallenged in the GOP primary, but the general election is a different story.

Corbett is considered one of the nation's most vulnerable incumbents right now, and a crowded field of Democrats is lined up in hopes of replacing him.

In his first term, Corbett apparently failed to wow Pennsylvania voters; his poll numbers remain consistently low. That has Democrats here optimistic, and one name in particular is becoming a lot more familiar.

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Shots - Health News
3:24 am
Mon May 19, 2014

Hacking The Brain With Electricity: Don't Try This At Home

Daniel Horowitz for NPR

Originally published on Wed May 21, 2014 9:34 am

It's the latest craze for people who want to improve their mental performance: zapping the brain with electricity to make it sharper and more focused. It's called "brain hacking," and some people are experimenting with it at home.

The idea's not completely crazy. Small jolts of electricity targeted at specific areas of the brain are used to treat diseases like epilepsy and Parkinson's, typically with tiny devices that must be surgically implanted.

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The Race Card Project: Six-Word Essays
3:21 am
Mon May 19, 2014

Six Words: 'You've Got To Be Taught' Intolerance

Actors John Kerr and France Nuyen in a scene from the 1958 film South Pacific. The interracial romance between the onstage pair unsettled some audiences.
20th Century Fox Getty Images

Originally published on Tue May 20, 2014 7:46 am

NPR continues a series of conversations about The Race Card Project, where thousands of people have submitted their thoughts on race and cultural identity in six words. Every so often, NPR Host/Special Correspondent Michele Norris will dip into those six-word stories to explore issues surrounding race and cultural identity for Morning Edition.

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Sports
6:28 pm
Sun May 18, 2014

Softballers Face A Fielder's Choice: When To Wear A Face Mask?

Ferris High School softball player Kylee Fowler stands beside the dugout, face mask on and ready.
Lauren Silverman KERA News

In Texas, it's playoff time for high school softball teams. While softball is one of the safest high school sports in the state, concussions remain a real risk for players — especially those who frequently field line drives from batters. That's partly why this year, fans and spectators can expect to see more girls wearing face masks than they have in the past.

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Africa
5:08 pm
Sun May 18, 2014

Nairobi Bombings Are A Sign Of Spreading Militant Influence

Originally published on Sun May 18, 2014 6:28 pm

A pair of bombs killed at least 10 people in Kenya's capital on Friday. What do these and a slew of other attacks in Kenya say about the security situation in the country and the region?

Humans
5:00 pm
Sun May 18, 2014

The First American Teenager, Millennia-Old And Underwater

Originally published on Sun May 18, 2014 6:28 pm

Transcript

TESS VIGELAND, HOST:

From the studios of NPR West in Culver City, California it's ALL THINGS CONSIDERED. I'M Tess Vigeland. Let us contemplate the American teenage girl, perhaps the very first one. Apparently, there's been some scientific debate about who she is and whether she hails from the same gene sequence as what we think of as the first Americans, American Indians. And when I say gene sequence, we're not talking about Skinnies from Urban Outfitters. NPR's science correspondent Joe Palca has the story of a very old American teenage identity crisis.

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Asia
5:00 pm
Sun May 18, 2014

In Sea Change Election, Young India Ushers In A New Political Era

Originally published on Sun May 18, 2014 6:28 pm

Transcript

TESS VIGELAND, HOST:

It's ALL THINGS CONSIDERED from NPR West. I'm Tess Vigeland in for Arun Rath. This week, Narendra Modi and his BJP party won India's general election in a landslide. Modi's historic victory upends years of political domination by the Gandhi family, which has been a ruling power since India's independence. NPR's Julie McCarthy is in New Delhi, and I asked her what Modi's election says about the kind of country India is now?

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Environment
5:00 pm
Sun May 18, 2014

Fighting Bugs With Bugs: Hatching A Solution For Troubled Trees

The invasive Asian citrus psyllid can carry citrus greening disease, which kills trees within a few years of infection.
Mike Lewis Center for Invasive Species Research, UC Riverside

Originally published on Tue May 20, 2014 3:11 pm

We all know about the drought in California, but farmers there have more to worry about than a lack of water.

There's also the looming threat of Asian citrus psyllid (ACP), an invasive pest that flies from tree to tree, feeding on tender leaves. By itself, the psyllid is not particularly harmful, but it can carry citrus greening disease, which kills trees within a few years of infection. There is no cure.

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Music Interviews
5:00 pm
Sun May 18, 2014

Six Decades Later, A Long-Lost Hank Williams Recording Resurfaces

Originally published on Mon May 19, 2014 1:35 pm

Transcript

TESS VIGELAND, HOST:

All right. If you're just joining us, it's ALL THINGS CONSIDERED from NPR West. I'm Tess Vigeland.

(SOUNDBITE OF ARCHIVE RADIO BROADCAST)

UNIDENTIFIED MAN: It's "The Garden Spot" Program presenting the songs of Hank Williams.

VIGELAND: Let's travel back for a few minutes to the year 1950.

(SOUNDBITE OF MUSIC)

HANK WILLIAMS: (Singing) Hello, everybody, Garden Spot is on the air. So just relax and listen in your easy rocking chair.

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The Two-Way
3:31 pm
Sun May 18, 2014

Worst Floods In A Century Kill At Least 24 In The Balkans

Volunteers use a rubber boat to evacuate residents from a flooded area in Obrenovac, some 18 miles southwest of Belgrade, Serbia on Sunday.
Darko Vojinovic AP

Originally published on Mon May 19, 2014 2:41 am

Post Updated: 2:30 a.m. ET Monday:

The unrelenting rain in the Balkans has caused the worst flooding since records began being kept. According to The Associated Press: The rain caused an estimated 2,100 landslides on Sunday that covered roads, homes and whole villages throughout hilly Bosnia. Another 1,000 landslides were reported in neighboring Serbia.

Thousands of people in the region have been forced from their homes. In some locations, flood waters receded on Sunday.

Original Post:

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The Two-Way
3:12 pm
Sun May 18, 2014

A Giant Among Dinosaurs, Discovered In Argentina

Originally published on Mon May 19, 2014 11:28 am

Paleontologists in Argentina say they have unearthed the fossils of the biggest dinosaur ever to walk the planet.

The bones are believed to be from a new species of the aptly named titanosaur, a massive herbivore from the late Cretaceous period, officials from the Museo Paleontologico Egidio Feruglio told BBC News.

The titanosaur was a sauropod, like the apatosaurus or brachiosaurus, that roamed the forests of Patagonia 95 million years ago.

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The Two-Way
1:58 pm
Sun May 18, 2014

'The Play Of The Game': Watch A Boy Win Over A Girl With A Foul Ball

A boy hands a girl a foul ball and she smiles broadly.
MLB

Originally published on Mon May 19, 2014 9:31 am

The game announcers called it "the play of the game." We'd be foolish not to agree.

During last night's Blue Jays-Rangers game, a boy catches a foul ball. Without a thought, he turns around and gives the ball to a much older girl, who flashes a major smile.

You're thinking, wow, what a smooth operator. But the replay reveals the kid is slicker than you imagined. Just watch:

h/t: Deadspin.

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Religion
1:34 pm
Sun May 18, 2014

Nigerian Church Spreads African-Style Zeal Across North America

Members of the Redeemed Christian Church of God pray at Redemption Camp in Floyd, Texas, in 2009. The church is on a mission to spread to every city in North America.
Jessica Rinaldi Reuters /Landov

Originally published on Sun May 18, 2014 1:50 pm

In earlier times, white missionaries traveled from Europe and America to sub-Saharan Africa to save souls.

Today, the trend has reversed. Evangelists from the global south are targeting Americans and Europeans they say are ripe for Christian renewal.

There is no greater example than the Redeemed Christian Church of God. This ambitious Nigerian denomination has established its North American headquarters in Texas, and its goal is nothing less than becoming the next major global religion.

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Middle East
12:51 pm
Sun May 18, 2014

Unity Is A Difficult Mission For Christians In Israel

Arab-Israeli children ride in a float during an annual march for Virgin Mary in the northern Israeli city of Haifa on May 11. Arab Christians don't mix much with migrant or Russian Christians.
Ahmad Gharibli AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Mon May 19, 2014 1:58 pm

Pope Francis visits the Mideast next week, including Israel, where Christians make up just 2 percent of the population.

But since the last papal visit to the Holy Land five years ago, the number of Christians in Israel has increased, and the makeup of the Christian population has continued to shift.

The vast majority of Israeli Christians have always been Arab and they still make up three-quarters of the 160,000 Christians living in Israel. But tens of thousands of Christians have come to Israel from Asia and Africa — both legal workers and undocumented migrants.

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