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The Protojournalist
11:25 am
Sat May 17, 2014

5 Fab Fads That Just Faded Away

Originally published on Sat May 17, 2014 3:02 pm

Fads sweep across America like thunderstorms.

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Sports
11:10 am
Sat May 17, 2014

Defending Champs Advance In NHL, NBA Series

Originally published on Sat May 17, 2014 11:29 am

Transcript

SCOTT SIMON, HOST:

Now, with pleasure to note, it's time for sports. Conference championships in hockey and basketball, both defending champions seem to be making their move. So to the strains of B.J. Leiderman's theme music of which he writes all of ours, we're joined now by Howard Bryant of espn.com and ESPN The Magazine from the studios of New England Public Radio. Thanks for being with us, Howard.

HOWARD BRYANT: Boy, that's a lot of energy, Scott. You must be a Blackhawks fan.

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The Two-Way
10:02 am
Sat May 17, 2014

For First Time, Judge Halts Force-Feeding Of Guantánamo Detainee

Clouds cover the sky over Guantanamo Bay, Cuba.
Pool Getty Images

Originally published on Sat May 17, 2014 1:11 pm

In the first ruling of its kind, District Judge Gladys Kessler has halted the force-feeding of a Syrian man being detained at Guantánamo Bay, Cuba.

In a brief order, Kessler said the U.S. should not force-feed Jihad Ahmed Mujstafa Dhiab until after a hearing set for May 21. Kessler also asked the U.S. to keep any videotapes showing Dhiab's force-feeding.

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The Two-Way
8:00 am
Sat May 17, 2014

Oprah Winfrey's Channel Calls Off Michael Sam Series

St. Louis Rams rookie defensive end Michael Sam runs a drill during the team's rookie camp. He won't be followed by Oprah channel cameras for a documentary, as had been planned.
Jeff Roberson AP

Oprah Winfrey's television network was set to follow Michael Sam through rookie camp as he tried to earn a spot on the St. Louis Rams. The docuseries was to follow Sam, the first openly gay NFL player, with a camera team at training camp as well as his personal life — a "historic moment in professional sports," OWN's president told ESPN.

But OWN put the project on indefinite hold Friday to give Sam a chance to work without distraction.

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The Two-Way
7:50 am
Sat May 17, 2014

NAACP Selects Minister, Former Lawyer, As New President

Cornell William Brooks at the 2013 New Jersey Institute for Social Justice gala.
NJISJ

Originally published on Sat May 17, 2014 10:21 am

The board of directors for the NAACP announced it has selected Cornell William Brooks as its new president and CEO.

"Mr. Brooks is a pioneering lawyer and civil rights leader, who brings a wealth of knowledge and experience to the Association," Roslyn M. Brock, Chairman of the NAACP Board of Directors, said in a statement. "We look forward to leveraging his legal prowess, vision and leadership as we tackle the pressing civil rights issues of the 21st century."

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Europe
7:49 am
Sat May 17, 2014

Turkish Coal Miner Faces Future After Tragedy

Originally published on Sat May 17, 2014 11:29 am

Transcript

SCOTT SIMON, HOST:

The mining town of Soma in Western Turkey is reeling after Tuesday's mine explosion. At least 300 people have died there. The government's now winding down the recovery operation, but many townspeople fear more miners remain underground and believe officials are covering up the real number of the dead. The mine has been shut and survivors are asking how they can support their families with no jobs. NPR's Leila Fadel sat down with one of the miners and sent this report.

MURAT YOKUS: (Turkish spoken).

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Africa
7:49 am
Sat May 17, 2014

How South Sudan Came To The Brink Of Civil War

Originally published on Sat May 17, 2014 11:37 am

South Sudan is being torn apart by ethnic violence. NPR's Scott Simon talks to David Deng, research director for the South Sudan Law Society, about efforts to save the country from a civil war.

Health
7:49 am
Sat May 17, 2014

Measles And Mumps Make A Comeback

Originally published on Sat May 17, 2014 11:29 am

Transcript

SCOTT SIMON, HOST:

More than 90 percent of American toddlers get the MMR vaccine. It protects against measles, mumps and rubella. But in Ohio, more than 350 cases of mumps have been confirmed this year. And the CDC has said that measles cases are at their highest in two decades.

To try and find out why and how these viruses are spreading, we're joined by William Schaffner. He teaches preventive medicine at Vanderbilt University. Professor, thanks for being with us.

WILLIAM SCHAFFNER: My pleasure, Scott.

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Space
7:49 am
Sat May 17, 2014

Russia Says It Will End Space Station Collaboration With U.S.

Originally published on Sat May 17, 2014 11:29 am

Transcript

SCOTT SIMON, HOST:

This is WEEKEND EDITION from NPR News. I'm Scott Simon. The U.S. and Russia have collaborated in space since before the end of the Cold War despite any political disagreements. Until now, that is, in the current tensions over Ukraine. Last month, the U.S. slapped sanctions on the deputy prime minister in charge of Russia's space program because of his role in annexing Crimea.

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Middle East
7:49 am
Sat May 17, 2014

Iran Reluctant To Disclose Secret Nuclear Activities

Originally published on Sat May 17, 2014 11:29 am

Transcript

SCOTT SIMON, HOST:

Another round of nuclear talks between world powers in Iran ended yesterday and negotiations are expected to run through July. The U.S. wants to limit Iran's nuclear program. Iran wants relief from economic sanctions, but there are some mysteries, including rumors and reports about old weapons programs Iran allegedly hid.

And that poses a dilemma. How does it admit to past concealment? Well, it asked the world to trust it under a new deal. NPR's Peter Kenyon reports from the talks in Vienna.

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Asia
7:49 am
Sat May 17, 2014

How Will Narendra Modi Change India?

Originally published on Sat May 17, 2014 11:29 am

In a historic election, Narendra Modi and the Hindu nationalist party ousted India's long-ruling Congress party. Scott Simon talks with NPR's Julie McCarthy about what this political shift means for India.

Shots - Health News
7:49 am
Sat May 17, 2014

High Charges By Doctors May Or May Not Be Red Flags For Fraud

Doctors who bill the federal government for a lot of services may be gaming the system, but there also may be a reasonable explanation.
Aslan Alphan Getty Images

Originally published on Sat May 17, 2014 11:29 am

That which walks like a duck, and talks like a duck, is not always actually a duck.

That's the argument the American Medical Association has been using for decades to block public access to doctors' Medicare billing records. The AMA worries that people and the press will misinterpret the numbers when they see how doctors bill the government's $500 billion health care program for the elderly and disabled, and that doctors who are doing nothing wrong could be unfairly accused of fraud.

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Around the Nation
7:49 am
Sat May 17, 2014

Gender And Money At The Helm Of 'The New York Times'

Originally published on Sat May 17, 2014 11:29 am

Rumors are flying over the firing of The New York Time's first female editor, Jill Abramson. Scott Simon talks with NPR's David Folkenflik about how gender and compensation may have played a roll.

Movie Interviews
7:49 am
Sat May 17, 2014

Director Bendjelloul Searched For Mysterious 'Sugar Man'

Originally published on Sat May 17, 2014 11:29 am

Transcript

SCOTT SIMON, HOST:

This week, Malik Bendejelloul, who won the 2013 Oscar for his film "Searching for Sugar Man," was found dead in Stockholm. The cause of death is unknown, though his brother told the Guardian newspaper that Malik Bendejelloul took his own life after a struggle with depression.

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Author Interviews
7:49 am
Sat May 17, 2014

Mark Twain's Famous Outcasts Float Through Three Centuries

Originally published on Sat May 17, 2014 11:29 am

Transcript

SCOTT SIMON, HOST:

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