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5:12 am
Thu May 15, 2014

Dozens Of Protesters Picked Up Ahead Of Tiananmen Anniversary

Originally published on Thu May 15, 2014 10:55 am

Chinese authorities have arrested or detained dozens of people ahead of the 25th anniversary of the Tiananmen Square crackdown. This is an annual ritual ahead of a sensitive political date in China.

Around the Nation
5:12 am
Thu May 15, 2014

Lawyer Reflects On Nation's First Gay Marriages: 'The Cage Had Been Lifted'

Bonauto celebrates on May 17, 2005, the one-year anniversary of legal same-sex marriage in Massachusetts. Bonauto argued the case that benefited couples like Hillary and Julie Goodridge (at right), here with their daughter Annie.
Darren McCollester Getty Images

Originally published on Fri May 16, 2014 7:20 am

Ten years ago this week, attorney Mary Bonauto woke up with more than just your average case of pre-wedding jitters. It had been six months since her arguments had persuaded Massachusetts' highest court to allow the nation's first legal gay marriages, but opponents were still trying to stop the weddings before they started.

"I had been so scared, so many times, during really what had been really a ferocious onslaught to try to keep marriages from ever happening, so I continued to worry," Bonauto recalls.

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NPR Story
5:12 am
Thu May 15, 2014

Who Wears Short Shorts?

Originally published on Thu May 15, 2014 10:55 am

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

And for today's last word in business, we have a new answer to an old question.

(SOUNDBITE OF MUSIC)

UNIDENTIFIED MEN: (Singing) Who wears short shorts?

UNIDENTIFIED WOMEN: (Singing) We wear short shorts.

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NPR Story
5:12 am
Thu May 15, 2014

Travel Plans Are Looking Up For Airline Industry

Originally published on Thu May 15, 2014 10:55 am

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

NPR's business news starts with friendly skies for airlines.

After a brutal winter, which hurt both American's travels plans and airline profits, things are looking up. More than 200 million passengers are expected to fly on U.S.-based airlines this summer.

According to a leading industry group, A4A, that is the most since the financial crisis six years ago. This included a projected record number of passengers flying from the U.S. to international destinations. Transcript provided by NPR, Copyright NPR.

All Tech Considered
3:42 am
Thu May 15, 2014

FCC To Unveil Proposed Rules To Govern Internet Traffic

Proponents of open Internet access protest in front of the FCC headquarters in Washington, D.C. The commission votes Thursday on its proposed rules amid debate about network neutrality.
Elise Hu NPR

Originally published on Thu May 15, 2014 2:55 pm

The Federal Communications Commission announced last month that it would propose new rules. In a blog post, Chairman Tom Wheeler insists that the open Internet rules will help maintain what's called network neutrality. That is, making certain that your Internet provider doesn't give a faster connection to a service that can pay more.

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Around the Nation
3:05 am
Thu May 15, 2014

Across The U.S., Bicycle Commuting Picks Up Speed

The ranks of bicycle commuters are growing, though men are almost three times more likely than women to ride to work.
Tobias Ackeborn iStockphoto

Originally published on Thu May 15, 2014 10:55 am

As bicycling goes, America is far behind Copenhagen, the promised land where roads look like bicycle highways as people pedal to work. But commuting by bike in the U.S. is catching on — though geographic, income and gender disparities persist.

In Chicago, busy Sheridan Road is the start of the Lakefront bike trail on its north side. That's where you can find plenty of bicyclists commuting to work early in the morning.

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Law
3:04 am
Thu May 15, 2014

U.S. Border Patrol's Response To Violence In Question

Patrolling the U.S.-Mexico border can be dangerous. Still, critics say there isn't enough public accountability when Border Patrol agents use deadly force.
Eric Thayer Reuters/Landov

Originally published on Thu May 15, 2014 10:55 am

Picnickers in a riverside park in Nuevo Laredo, Mexico, react in horror as a man in a yellow baseball cap named Guillermo Arevalo lies on the bank of the Rio Grande, bleeding to death.

It's a warm Monday evening in September 2012. He has just been shot by an agent on a U.S. Border Patrol airboat on the river. The Border Patrol says the agent shot at rock throwers and that the incident is under investigation.

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Television
3:03 am
Thu May 15, 2014

Bye-Bye To Barbara Walters: A Long 'View' Of A Storied Career

Walters credits ABC News head Roone Arledge with jump-starting her career by sending her on the road, to do interviews with people like Fidel Castro.
AP

Originally published on Thu May 15, 2014 10:55 am

Barbara Walters had a big interview recently: She spoke with V. Stiviano, the girlfriend of disgraced L.A. Clippers owner Donald Sterling.

"Are you in love with Donald Sterling?" Walters asks. "I love him," Stiviano answers. There's a little back-and-forth about the nature of their love, and in the end, Stiviano admits she's not in love with Sterling, but she does love him "like a father figure."

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Digital Life
7:13 pm
Wed May 14, 2014

In Kansas, Professors Must Now Watch What They Tweet

Originally published on Thu May 15, 2014 3:17 pm

The Kansas Board of Regents gave final approval Wednesday to a strict new policy on what employees may say on social media. Critics say the policy violates both the First Amendment and academic freedom, but school officials say providing faculty with more specific guidelines will actually bolster academic freedom on campus.

The controversial policy was triggered by an equally controversial tweet posted last September by David Guth, an associate journalism professor. Reacting to a lone gunman who killed 12 people at the Washington Navy Yard in Washington, D.C., he wrote:

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The Two-Way
7:05 pm
Wed May 14, 2014

Regulators Couldn't Close U.S. Mine Despite Poor Safety Record

Originally published on Wed May 14, 2014 8:10 pm

The West Virginia mine where two workers were fatally injured on Monday consistently violated federal mine safety laws, but federal regulators say they were unable to shut it down completely.

The Mine Safety and Health Administration confirmed that two workers were killed on May 12 when coal and rocks burst from mine walls at Patriot Coal's Brody No. 1 mine in Boone County, W.Va.

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The Salt
6:34 pm
Wed May 14, 2014

How Food Companies Court Nutrition Educators With Junk Food

Originally published on Fri May 16, 2014 2:41 pm

When hundreds of California nutritionists and dietitians gathered for their annual conference in April, their Friday lunch was a bacon ranch salad, chocolate chip cookies and a pink yogurt parfait, all courtesy of McDonald's.

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Parallels
6:30 pm
Wed May 14, 2014

After Referendum In Eastern Ukraine, Different Visions Emerge

A woman casts her ballot at a polling station on May 11 in Hartsizk, Ukraine. Pro-Russian separatists are claiming independence after the referendum in cities across eastern Ukraine.
Brendan Hoffman Getty Images

Originally published on Wed May 14, 2014 7:59 pm

In eastern Ukraine, pro-Russian separatists are claiming independence based on a victory in a hastily organized referendum. Now, they're resisting a nationwide presidential election that's scheduled for May 25.

With Russian troops still massed near the border, Ukrainian and international mediators are trying to find a solution for the crisis.

There are some very different visions of the future for the volatile region.

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It's All Politics
6:22 pm
Wed May 14, 2014

Feinstein Wants CIA To Speed 'Torture Report' Release

Dianne Feinstein, chairwoman of the Senate Intelligence Committee, speaks to reporters in April. She tells NPR she's "not particularly" comfortable with the CIA vetting the "Torture Report."
Molly Riley AP

Originally published on Wed May 14, 2014 7:22 pm

It's been well over a month since the Senate Intelligence Committee voted 11 to 3 to declassify and make public the executive summary and findings of its "Torture Report."

But it's not likely that will actually happen anytime soon.

The reason? The CIA — the very agency skewered in the 6,200-page report for its interrogation and detention of more than 100 terrorism suspects from 2001 through 2008 — has been given the job of deciding what to leave in and what to take out of the summary and findings.

And the CIA seems to be in no great rush to finish that job.

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It's All Politics
5:53 pm
Wed May 14, 2014

Past And Future Collide In Silicon Valley Congressional Race

Rep. Mike Honda, D-Calif., dances to the music of Los Tigres del Norte during an immigration rally on the National Mall in Washington in October 2013.
Jose Luis Magana AP

Originally published on Wed May 14, 2014 6:11 pm

The race between Rep. Mike Honda and Ro Khanna, two California Democrats vying to represent a Silicon Valley-based congressional district, is a classic example of a generational contest — a youthful challenger claiming to represent the future taking on a popular longtime incumbent.

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The Two-Way
5:52 pm
Wed May 14, 2014

Wildfires In Southern California Consume Thousands Of Acres

A helicopter attacks a wildfire burning in the north county of San Diego on Tuesday.
AP

Originally published on Thu May 15, 2014 10:26 am

This post was updated at 11:45 p.m. ET.

Thousands of residents in Southern California were fleeing their homes after being told by authorities to evacuate as nine wind-swept wildfires raged in the region.

In a news conference Wednesday night, officials said they were particularly concerned about the San Marcos fire, where more than 9,000 acres had burned.

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