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The Salt
11:47 am
Thu May 15, 2014

A Sponge Cake's Long, Strange Trip: Germany To Denver, Via Japan

A chef prepares the baumkuchen, a German layer cake made on a stick that when cut, resembles a tree with concentric rings.
LuxTonnerre Flickr.com

Originally published on Tue May 20, 2014 3:18 pm

For a cake the Germans call "the king of cakes" and the Japanese call "the ultimate wedding cake," the baumkuchen doesn't really look like a cake or behave like one. But it more than makes up for its oddities with rich flavor, history and symbolism.

It resembles a hollowed cross-section of a craggy tree trunk, or a planet's rings, depending on how you make it. It can have up to 21 delicate, sugary stratums, which give it a light yet chewy texture.

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Education
11:37 am
Thu May 15, 2014

Educating Girls: Big Payoff For $45 A Year

Originally published on Thu May 15, 2014 12:37 pm

Transcript

CELESTE HEADLEE, HOST:

This is TELL ME MORE from NPR News. I'm Celeste Headlee. Michel Martin is away. Nigeria has been in the news a lot lately. That's since the militant Islamic organization Boko Haram kidnapped hundreds of schoolgirls on April 15. Professed to be against Western education, Boko Haram took the girls away from their books and their teachers and have threatened to sell them as wives and slaves.

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Music
11:36 am
Thu May 15, 2014

Breaking Up Helped Ledisi Find 'The Truth' In Her Music

Ledisi performs at the 2013 BET Honors awards. The singer has been nominated for eight Grammy awards over the past 10 years.
Kris Connor Getty Images for BET

Originally published on Thu May 15, 2014 12:37 pm

Singer songwriter Ledisi has had eight Grammy nominations, and says she is grateful for that. "I would like to win, but it will happen when its time."

For more than 10 years, Ledisi has garnered an international fan base while striving to grow her musical abilities.

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Around the Nation
11:34 am
Thu May 15, 2014

The Pact That Turned A Juvenile Delinquent Into A Medical Doctor

Originally published on Thu May 15, 2014 12:37 pm

Transcript

CELESTE HEADLEE, HOST:

This is TELL ME MORE from NPR News. I'm Celeste Headlee. Michel Martin is away. Our friends at All Things Considered have been collecting stories of moments when people's careers took off. It's called My Big Break.

They recently spoke to Dr. Sampson Davis who grew up in the rough parts of Newark, N.J. He talked about how doing a stint in juvie put his life in perspective.

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It's All Politics
11:13 am
Thu May 15, 2014

After Cory Booker, Newark Takes A New Turn

Ras Baraka (right) is greeted by supporters after casting his vote Tuesday in Newark, N.J. Baraka defeated Shavar Jeffries, a former state assistant attorney general, for the mayoral office Cory Booker occupied from 2006 until October 2013.
AP

Originally published on Thu May 15, 2014 8:45 pm

It's not Cory Booker's city any longer.

In Newark's first mayoral election since the Democratic senator left for Washington, voters picked a progressive candidate whose election signaled a break from both the Booker era and the period of dominance Republican Gov. Chris Christie has had over New Jersey politics.

Ras Baraka, a city councilman, won election as mayor Tuesday after running a populist campaign that had strong support from unions and other groups on the left.

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The Two-Way
10:57 am
Thu May 15, 2014

VA's Shinseki 'Mad As Hell' Over Alleged Delays At Facility

Veterans Affairs Secretary Eric Shinseki testifies before the Senate Veterans Affairs Committee on Thursday in Washington, D.C.
Cliff Owen AP

Originally published on Thu May 15, 2014 2:42 pm

Updated at 2:33 p.m. ET

Veterans Affairs Secretary Eric Shinseki told a Senate panel today [Thursday] that he hoped to have a preliminary report within three weeks on the problem of delayed treatment and preventable deaths at VA facilities across the nation.

His testimony came amid allegations that such conditions persisted at a VA hospital in Phoenix. Shinseki said he was "mad as hell" about the reports.

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The Two-Way
10:34 am
Thu May 15, 2014

'She's A Hero!' Boy Says Of Cat Who Fought Off Attacking Dog

An image taken from a video posted by Roger Triantafilo shows a dog closing in on his son Jeremy earlier this week. The family's cat fought off the dog after it bit the 4-year-old boy.
YouTube

Originally published on Thu May 15, 2014 7:15 pm

A family's story of how their cat ran off a dog that had attacked their young son is making waves far beyond Bakersfield, Calif., as the incident was captured in a dramatic video. Surveillance cameras caught the dog viciously biting Jeremy Triantafilo and dragging him — before the family cat rushes to his rescue.

"She's a hero!" 4-year-old Jeremy said of the cat, Tara, in an interview with KERO 23 TV. He said, "I love Tara a whole lot."

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U.S.
10:28 am
Thu May 15, 2014

San Diego County Wildfires Prompt Evacuations, State Of Emergency

Originally published on Thu May 15, 2014 10:55 am

More than a half-dozen wildfires are burning in the Southern California county. Thousands of residents have been evacuated. Renee Montagne speaks with reporter Erik Anderson of member station KPBS.

Shots - Health News
8:37 am
Thu May 15, 2014

Just One-Third Of People Can Tell If You're Faking That Laugh

Does she really think you're funny, or is she just being polite?
Jon Feingersh/Getty Getty Images/Blend Images RM

Originally published on Thu May 15, 2014 11:42 am

  • Researcher Greg Bryant Speaks To NPR's Robert Siegel

Scene: The happy-hour office party.

Your boss is relaxed, drink in hand. A little liquid courage of your own, and you approach her, taking a shot at an opportunity to impress. You open with a quip. She chuckles.

But does she really mean it? Or is she faking?

Only one-third of people can tell the difference between a fake laugh and the real deal, according to a study by Greg Bryant, a professor of communication at University of California, Los Angeles.

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The Two-Way
8:32 am
Thu May 15, 2014

Turkish Mine Explosion: Angry Protests As Death Toll Rises

People dig graves Thursday for miners who died in an explosion in Soma, Turkey. Anger over what's being called the deadliest industrial accident in the country's history has set off protests nationwide.
Bulent Kilic AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Thu May 15, 2014 10:42 am

The death toll in the coal mine explosion in Turkey keeps rising, and anger over the incident has spread around the country. Thousands of people staged protests after a speech from Prime Minister Recep Tayyip Erdogan in which he suggested such accidents are unavoidable.

Officials say at least 282 mine workers have died in the incident in the city of Soma. That figure seems certain to rise, as about 100 people are still missing. The mine explosion is already being called the deadliest industrial disaster in Turkey's history.

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Shots - Health News
7:19 am
Thu May 15, 2014

Don't Salmon, Don't Shoal: Learning The Lingo Of Safe Cycling

What's that salmon doing in the bike lane?
Leif Parsons for NPR

Originally published on Fri May 16, 2014 9:48 am

Alec Baldwin, you were salmoning!

The actor was ticketed in New York on Tuesday for riding his bicycle the wrong way on a one-way street.

Cyclists use the term "salmoning" to describe a biker going against the stream on a one-way bike lane. Surely the definition can be broadened to include Baldwin's infraction.

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Around the Nation
7:14 am
Thu May 15, 2014

Studio Turns Potholes Into Art

Originally published on Thu May 15, 2014 10:55 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

Good morning. I'm Renee Montagne. "Positively Filling Negative Space" was the arty title of a 2012 project by the Pop Up Studio in Scranton, Pennsylvania. And what space could more negative than a pothole? This month the art group is challenging residents to turn potholes into art. Photo entries show potholes transformed into a bird's nest, oysters on ice, a sudsy sink, a bowl of spaghetti and a swimming pool surrounded by Barbies in bikinis. It's MORNING EDITION. Transcript provided by NPR, Copyright NPR.

Around the Nation
7:14 am
Thu May 15, 2014

Police Apprehend Man Looking For Eggs In Neighbor's Home

Originally published on Thu May 15, 2014 10:55 am

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

Good morning. I'm Steve Inskeep.

Police in Bucks County, Pennsylvania responded to a burglary report. They found a suspect who said it was a misunderstanding. According to the Courier Times, Christopher King said he was just doing as neighbors do. He broke into his neighbor's home to borrow some eggs for breakfast. Something about that story so makes you want to believe, but King appeared to have been looking for eggs by opening dresser and cabinet drawers throughout the entire house.

The Two-Way
7:09 am
Thu May 15, 2014

10,000 Gallons Of Oil Spill In LA Neighborhood

Originally published on Thu May 15, 2014 3:30 pm

Crude oil geysered high into the air in northeast Los Angeles early Thursday morning, creating a spill that fire officials say was knee-deep in some spots. The spill happened in an industrial section of Atwater Village, causing the evacuation of a nearby strip club.

Update at 8:10 a.m. ET: Oil Estimate Downgraded

After initially saying that "over 50,000" gallons of oil had spilled from a ruptured pipeline, Los Angeles Fire Department officials now say the correct figure is about 10,000 gallons.

Our original post continues:

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Krulwich Wonders...
6:49 am
Thu May 15, 2014

How To Marry The Right Girl: A Mathematical Solution

Robert Krulwich NPR

Originally published on Thu May 15, 2014 2:34 pm

Poor Johannes Kepler. One of the greatest astronomers ever, the man who figured out the laws of planetary motion, a genius, scholar and mathematician — in 1611, he needed a wife. The previous Mrs. Kepler had died of Hungarian spotted fever, so, with kids to raise and a household to manage, he decided to line up some candidates — but it wasn't going very well.

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