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Television
7:35 pm
Thu April 3, 2014

Dave Letterman Signals He'll Soon Put Down The Microphone

Transcript

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

David Letterman, the longest-serving late night television host, is retiring.

(SOUNDBITE OF SHOW, 'LATE NIGHT WITH DAVID LETTERMAN')

DAVID LETTERMAN: Sometime in the not-so-distant future, 2015 for the love of God, in fact, Paul and I will be wrapping things up and taking a hike.

SIEGEL: Letterman, who is 66, told the audience today during a taping of his late show program which will air tonight. Here to talk about David Letterman is NPR TV critic Eric Deggans. And Eric, why has Letterman decided to retire now?

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Shots - Health News
7:14 pm
Thu April 3, 2014

Shooting Unfairly Links Violence With Mental Illness — Again

Lt. Gen. Mark Milley speaks to reporters April 2 regarding the second shooting in five years on the Fort Hood Army post in Texas.
Drew Anthony Smith Getty Images

Originally published on Fri April 4, 2014 9:05 am

With the Army's disclosure that Army Spc. Ivan Lopez was being evaluated for post-traumatic stress disorder before he went on a shooting rampage Wednesday, there were once again questions about whether the Army could have prevented the violence at Fort Hood.

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Rethinking Retirement: The Changing Work Landscape
6:22 pm
Thu April 3, 2014

One More Speed Bump For Your Retirement Fund: Basic Human Impulse

We hate losing twice as much as we love winning, behavioral researchers say. And that gets us into trouble with financial decisions.
iStockphoto

Originally published on Thu April 3, 2014 7:34 pm

Saving for retirement is a challenge facing most Americans. Research shows the challenge is made harder by our basic human impulses. We know we should be saving. But we don't. We consistently make bad financial decisions.

One thing that leads us astray is what behavioral economists call "loss aversion." In other words, we hate losing. And that gets in the way of us winning — if winning is making smart financial decisions.

How A Smashed Car Is Like A Smashed Nest Egg

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Book Reviews
6:22 pm
Thu April 3, 2014

Dinaw Mengestu Embraces The Vastness Of Love And War

Eli Meir Kaplan Courtesy of the John D. & Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation

Originally published on Thu April 3, 2014 7:34 pm

Why do love and war go so well together in novels? It isn't only because they're both naturally dramatic themes. Sometimes, in fact, each is so big and overwhelming that they can seem beyond the grasp of words. And so a writer who tries to show the struggle of two people with deep feelings for each other, "set against a backdrop of violence" (as a novel's flap copy might read), can just seem like he's overreaching. But Dinaw Mengestu uses love and war to powerfully explore a third, equally dramatic theme: identity.

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Music Reviews
6:22 pm
Thu April 3, 2014

The High Voice Of The Low Anthem Breaks Out As Arc Iris

Arc Iris is the self-titled solo debut of Jocie Adams, a former member of The Low Anthem.
Shervin Lainez Courtesy of the artist

Originally published on Thu April 3, 2014 7:34 pm

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The Two-Way
5:55 pm
Thu April 3, 2014

Another Tragedy For A City All Too Familiar With Extreme Gun Violence

Bob Butler (left) and Bob Gordon work on a memorial Thursday at Central Christian Church in Killeen, Texas, for the victims of the Fort Hood shooting.
Eric Gay AP

Originally published on Thu April 3, 2014 8:15 pm

Flags are fluttering at half-staff across Killeen, Texas, after yesterday's shooting at Fort Hood. This is a city that's all too familiar with spasms of extreme gun violence: a shooting rampage at Luby's Cafeteria in 1991 that left 23 dead.

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Politics
5:39 pm
Thu April 3, 2014

For Political Conventions, Another Balloon Bursts

President Obama stands on stage with Vice President Biden and their families after accepting the party nomination during the final day of the 2012 Democratic National Convention in Charlotte, N.C.
Alex Wong Getty Images

Originally published on Thu April 3, 2014 7:34 pm

There's news today about the 2016 presidential campaign that has nothing to do with the growing list of would-be candidates with White House aspirations.

It's about the big nominating conventions the Democrats and Republicans hold every four years. Legislation the president signed Thursday afternoon means those huge political extravaganzas will no longer receive millions of dollars in taxpayer support. It's not the only change that's likely for conventions.

Let's start with a little time travel:

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The Two-Way
5:25 pm
Thu April 3, 2014

David Letterman Will Retire In 2015

David Letterman attends "Howard Stern's Birthday Bash" presented in January.
Larry Busacca Getty

Originally published on Thu April 3, 2014 6:23 pm

David Letterman, the host of CBS' Late Show, will retire in 2015.

His production company Worldwide Pants Inc. said in a press release:

"David Letterman, during a taping of tonight's Late Show, said that he informed Leslie Moonves, President and CEO of CBS Corporation, that he will step down as the host of the show in 2015, which is when his current contract expires.

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Mental Health
4:43 pm
Thu April 3, 2014

New Shooting Revives Old Questions About Mental Health In Military

Originally published on Thu April 3, 2014 7:34 pm

The mass shooting at Fort Hood, the second at the same Army base in just five years, is renewing questions about the state of mental health treatment on U.S. military bases.

Politics
4:43 pm
Thu April 3, 2014

Mega-Donor Opens Wallet On The Hill To Kill Online Gambling

Sheldon Adelson listens as New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie speaks during the Republican Jewish Coalition meeting on March 29 in Las Vegas. Several possible GOP presidential candidates gathered in Las Vegas as Adelson, a billionaire casino magnate, looks for a new favorite to help on the 2016 race for the White House.
Julie Jacobson AP

Originally published on Thu April 3, 2014 7:34 pm

Now that the Supreme Court has eliminated the cap on the total amount one individual can give to candidates in each election, many are wondering how the very rich will respond.

If they spread their money across a wider swath of lawmakers, would that improve their chances of passing the legislation they want?

Casino magnate Sheldon Adelson could be the first test case.

Expanding One's Reach Across Congress

Adelson is pushing a bill through Congress that would ban online gambling, and he has pledged he will spend "whatever it takes."

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News
4:43 pm
Thu April 3, 2014

On Base And In Town, Shooting Summons A Dread All Too Familiar

Originally published on Thu April 3, 2014 6:22 pm

From Killeen, Texas, where Fort Hood is based, Melissa Block talks to soldiers who were on base during the shooting, as well as with Killeen's mayor. The mayor explains how the town is trying to cope.

News
4:43 pm
Thu April 3, 2014

What's Known — And Still Unclear — About The Fort Hood Shooting

Originally published on Thu April 3, 2014 7:34 pm

Transcript

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

From NPR News, this is ALL THINGS CONSIDERED. I'm Robert Siegel. We're continuing to follow developments in yesterday's deadly shooting at Fort Hood that left four people dead and 16 wounded. This afternoon, the commander of Fort Hood, Lieutenant General Mark Milley, confirmed the identity of the shooter.

LIEUTENTANT GENERAL MARK MILLEY: We are able to release, his next kin have been notified. The alleged shooter is Specialist Ivan A. Lopez. He is 34 years old, originally from Puerto Rico.

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Author Interviews
4:43 pm
Thu April 3, 2014

In The 1870s And '80s, Being A Pedestrian Was Anything But

Courtesy of Chicago Review Press

Originally published on Wed April 9, 2014 11:58 am

We may think of baseball as America's national pastime, but in the 1870s and 1880s there was another sports craze sweeping the nation: competitive walking. "Watching people walk was America's favorite spectator sport," Matthew Algeo says in his new book, Pedestrianism.

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Sports
4:43 pm
Thu April 3, 2014

Should The NCAA Change Its Rules To Pay For Play?

University of Miami President Donna Shalala cuts down the net after a basketball game against Clemson last year.
J Pat Carter AP

Originally published on Thu April 3, 2014 7:34 pm

In the next few days, the last four teams play for the NCAA men's basketball championship, a hugely profitable event for college sports.

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Sports
4:43 pm
Thu April 3, 2014

Basketball Prep Schools: A World Of Their Own, And Recruiting Worldwide

Originally published on Thu April 3, 2014 7:34 pm

Transcript

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

With the Final Four happening this weekend, there's a lot of attention on young basketball players and the high schools that produced them. Some of the best athletes emerge from schools that never win state championships because they operate outside of state athletic associations. In the basketball world they are called prep schools.

Alexandra Starr takes us to one such school, Our Savior New American on Long Island.

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