Kate Stein

Reporter

Kate Stein can't quite explain what attracts her to South Florida. It's more than just the warm weather (although this Wisconsin native and Northwestern University graduate definitely appreciates the South Florida sunshine). It has a lot to do with being able to travel from the Everglades to Little Havana to Brickell without turning off 8th Street. It's also related to Stein's fantastic coworkers, whom she first got to know during a winter 2016 internship.

Officially, Stein is WLRN's environment, data and transportation journalist. Privately, she uses her job as an excuse to rove around South Florida searching for stories à la Carl Hiaasen and Edna Buchanan. Regardless, Stein speaks Spanish and is always thrilled to run, explore and read. 

Ways to Connect

Joel Ryan / AP

The first day of school can be traumatic. Reluctant high schoolers schlep unopened summer reading books aboard early morning buses. Kindergartners sob at being separated from their parents -- and vice-versa.

 

For students in Miami-Dade and Broward public schools, the first-day-of-school drama could be intensified this year by the solar eclipse that's also happening Monday.

 

Courtesy of Brightline

Colorful new trains are coming down the tracks from West Palm Beach to Miami -- although not carrying passengers quite yet.

Testing is underway for the first phase of the Brightline train service, and passengers should be able to ride the West Palm Beach-to-Fort Lauderdale portion of the line before the end of 2017, says company CEO Dave Howard.

Trains to Miami, Howard says, will start several weeks after that. But he’s not committing to exact dates just yet.

Kate Stein / WLRN

In South Florida, climate change means higher seas, stronger storms and hotter summers. That could make the region unlivable within a couple hundred years. But scientists say if the world takes steps like reducing carbon emissions, we could buy ourselves some time.

A group of concerned citizens is trying to get that message out.

Courtesy of Glenn Schneider via NPR

On Aug. 21, the moon will pass between the sun and the Earth, creating a solar eclipse.

GO_GREENER_OZ VIA FLICKR

Temperatures are getting hotter and the seas are rising, and if we want to stay in South Florida, we’re going to have to adapt. But that can be tricky to talk about. It’s hard to think about the threat of giving up our homes.

CRRC


Miami Herald file photo

Mayor Carlos Gimenez last year was a big supporter of the Miami-Dade County SMART Plan to build trains along six high-traffic travel corridors. But the mayor recently changed his position.

Kate Stein / WLRN

A chemical used for mosquito control in South Florida has been the source of controversy in recent weeks, after a study showed it could be linked to developmental delays in infants.

Kyle Holsten / WLRN

When he had a landscaping business, Bob Hartmann grew 200,000 orchids and thousands of other plants on his three acres in Southwest Ranches, about 15 miles southwest of Fort Lauderdale.

 


Ted Murphy / Flickr

Planning to have a baby in the Miami metro area? You’d better do it fast.

A study released Thursday says that of the 50 largest U.S. cities, Miami is the fourth most likely to face a shortage of obstetricians and gynecologists in the coming years.

Analysts say the number of OB/GYNs -- doctors who deliver babies and treat women of all ages -- isn’t growing fast enough to keep up with the growing U.S. population. That’s because many OB/GYNs are approaching retirement age, but not so many med students are entering the field to replace them.

Emily Michot / Miami Herald

What's the smartest way for Miami-Dade to address its excruciating traffic problems?

 

Not the trains in the $3.3-billion SMART (Strategic Miami Area Rapid Transit) Plan the county rolled out just last year, according to Mayor Carlos Gimenez.

Allison Light / Light

The case counts are low, but Zika's still a threat.

That was the message of a meeting of county and state mosquito control officials Monday in Doral.

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