Liz Halloran

Liz Halloran joined NPR in December 2008 as Washington correspondent for Digital News, taking her print journalism career into the online news world.

Halloran came to NPR from US News & World Report, where she followed politics and the 2008 presidential election. Before the political follies, Halloran covered the Supreme Court during its historic transition — from Chief Justice William Rehnquist's death, to the John Roberts and Samuel Alito confirmation battles. She also tracked the media and wrote special reports on topics ranging from the death penalty and illegal immigration, to abortion rights and the aftermath of the Amish schoolgirl murders.

Before joining the magazine, Halloran was a senior reporter in the Hartford Courant's Washington bureau. She followed Sen. Joe Lieberman on his ground-breaking vice presidential run in 2000, as the first Jewish American on a national ticket, wrote about the media and the environment and covered post-9/11 Washington. Previously, Halloran, a Minnesota native, worked for The Courant in Hartford. There, she was a member of Pulitzer Prize-winning team for spot news in 1999, and was honored by the New England Associated Press for her stories on the Kosovo refugee crisis.

She also worked for the Republican-American newspaper in Waterbury, Conn., and as a cub reporter and paper delivery girl for her hometown weekly, the Jackson County Pilot.

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It's All Politics
8:12 am
Wed August 29, 2012

Words, Good And Bad, Come Quickly To Mind For Many About Paul Ryan

Republican Rep. Paul Ryan of Wisconsin, who tonight is set to accept his party's vice presidential nomination.
Jeffrey Phelps Getty Images

Originally published on Wed August 29, 2012 10:07 am

When we arrived in Tampa for the Republican convention, much of the buzz centered on vice presidential pick, Rep. Paul Ryan of Wisconsin.

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It's All Politics
12:56 am
Wed August 29, 2012

Ann Romney Delivers: 'She May Have Privilege, But She Understands'

Supporters react during Ann Romney's speech on Tuesday at the Republican National Convention.
Becky Lettenberger NPR

Originally published on Wed August 29, 2012 8:17 am

A soft murmur of familiarity rippled through the packed GOP convention hall Tuesday night when Mitt Romney's wife, Ann, spoke not of their "storybook marriage" but of one touched by cancer, multiple sclerosis and the trials of raising five sometimes screaming children.

"A storybook marriage? Not at all," she said, during her much anticipated prime-time speech. "What Mitt Romney and I have is a real marriage."

It was that moment that encapsulated the job that Ann Romney had to do, and how well she managed it.

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It's All Politics
7:11 pm
Tue August 28, 2012

For One Young Delegate, Social Issues Are Not A Litmus Test

Alexander Reber, 21, a Virginia delegate and one of the youngest at the convention.
Liz Halloran NPR

Originally published on Tue August 28, 2012 7:40 pm

Alexander Reber may not be the youngest delegate at the Republican convention — that honor goes to his fellow Virginia delegate, 17-year-old high school senior Evan Draim.

But Reber, 21, who is an alternate, is certainly doing his part to lower the average age in the Tampa Bay Times Forum, where the convention opened Tuesday.

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It's All Politics
6:06 pm
Mon August 27, 2012

Ron Paul's Faithful Continue To Make Noise; Floor Fight Tuesday?

Ron Paul supporters pose with posters on the floor of the RNC on Monday in Tampa. They put "Ron Paul" over the word "We" on a GOP sign that says "We Can Do Better."
Liz Halloran NPR

Oh, Isaac. How good you've been to the Ron Paul Revolution!

With 24 hours of nothing officially happening at the GOP convention in Tampa because of Tropical Storm Isaac, Ron Paul supporters for the second time in as many days made themselves the center of attention at Mitt Romney's big nomination party.

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