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NPR Story
5:03 am
Fri April 25, 2014

'Ladies Home Journal' To End Monthly Publication

Originally published on Fri April 25, 2014 8:09 am

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

And our last word in business today is: A Farewell to Ladies Home Journal.

One of the country's oldest publications will end its run as a monthly magazine in July.

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

Ladies Home Journal published its first issue in 1883. It was one of the so-called Seven Sisters Publications recognized as the most essential women's magazines of the 19th and 20th centuries. Other of those big magazines included: McCall's, which folded a dozen years ago, and Redbook.

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NPR Story
5:03 am
Fri April 25, 2014

U.S., Japan Make Progress Toward Trade Deal

Originally published on Fri April 25, 2014 8:09 am

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

NPR's business news starts with a possible breakthrough in Japan.

(SOUNDBITE OF MUSIC)

INSKEEP: After two days of trade negotiations, both U.S. and Japanese officials say they have made progress toward an agreement to bring Japan into the Trans-Pacific Partnership - that's that proposed trade deal with a dozen Pacific Rim nations.

Around the Nation
5:03 am
Fri April 25, 2014

Alternatives Emerge To Affirmative Action

Originally published on Fri April 25, 2014 8:09 am

Opponents of affirmative action have often touted alternatives, like socio-economic based admissions, or targeted outreach. David Greene talks to University of Washington professor Mark Long.

Middle East
5:03 am
Fri April 25, 2014

Israel Suspends Peace Talks After Palestinians Reach Unity Deal

Originally published on Fri April 25, 2014 8:09 am

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

Let's talk about a busy week of news in the Middle East. Israel has now broken off peace talks with the Palestinians. These talks were already in a stalemate. This latest decision comes in response to internal Palestinian politics. This week two major Palestinian factions, Fatah and Hamas, agreed to end a seven-year split and form a coalition government. Hamas is considered a terrorist organization by Israel, as well as the United States and the European Union.

For more we turn to NPR's Emily Harris in Jerusalem. Emily, good morning.

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Middle East
5:03 am
Fri April 25, 2014

Syria Is On Track To Meet Chemical Weapons Deadline

Originally published on Fri April 25, 2014 8:09 am

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

This is about as close as we're going to get to good news out of Syria. The country is on track, we're told, to meet a deadline to give up its chemical weapons arsenal. The most dangerous chemicals in Syria's declared stockpile are supposed to be removed by Sunday, yet Syria now faces suspicion that it's using less toxic chemicals, possibly chlorine. NPR's Michele Kelemen reports.

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Around the Nation
7:03 am
Thu April 24, 2014

Colleges Move To Ban Selfie Taking At Graduation Ceremonies

Originally published on Thu April 24, 2014 7:30 am

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

Europe
6:57 am
Thu April 24, 2014

Amsterdam Mayor May Ban Pot In Red Light District, Court Says

Originally published on Thu April 24, 2014 7:30 am

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

Good morning. I'm Steve Inskeep.

Amsterdam is not quite the wide-open city you thought it was. Prostitution is legal in the Netherlands, and nobody prosecutes the possession of small amounts of marijuana. It's sold openly in shops. The mayor, though, wants to prevent you from doing those two things together. A court has upheld his effort to ban marijuana cafes within the Red Light District. So, it does not matter what you do in Amsterdam, but it does matter where you do it.

NPR Story
5:22 am
Thu April 24, 2014

With SuperShoes, Insoles Can Be Your Guide

Originally published on Thu April 24, 2014 7:30 am

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

And today's last word in business is: SuperShoes.

This new high-tech offering is not exactly footwear. SuperShoes are squishy insoles that fit inside your shoes.

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

And inside those insoles are vibrotactile ticklers that are linked to your mobile device. You enter a destination and apparently these ticklers will guide your way, with a tickle to the left or a tickle to the right.

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NPR Story
5:04 am
Thu April 24, 2014

U.S. Ramps Up Aid To Syrian Rebels

Originally published on Thu April 24, 2014 7:30 am

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

The CIA is ramping up a program to ship arms to rebels in Syria - more powerful weapons than in the past. The United States had resisted this step until now. We're learning about it from NPR Pentagon correspondent Tom Bowman who's in our studios once again. Tom, good morning.

TOM BOWMAN, BYLINE: Good morning, Steve.

INSKEEP: What kind of weapons are we talking about here?

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NPR Story
5:04 am
Thu April 24, 2014

Obama: U.S. To Defend Japan In Territorial Disputes With China

Originally published on Thu April 24, 2014 7:30 am

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

It's MORNING EDITION from NPR News. I'm Steve Inskeep.

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

And I'm David Greene. Good morning. President Obama is on the first leg of a four-country trip to Asia and today he reassured Japan that the U.S. will defend it in territorial disputes with China. China is not on the president's itinerary this time, but that country looms large over the trip all the same. NPR's Anthony Kuhn joins us from Seoul, which is the president's next stop. Anthony, good morning.

ANTHONY KUHN, BYLINE: Good morning, David.

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NPR Story
5:04 am
Thu April 24, 2014

Small Businesses Fight Big-Box Stores By Specializing

Originally published on Thu April 24, 2014 7:30 am

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

OK, we know mom and pop shops have been struggling for some time now, trying to compete against big-box stores and online retailers. Just in the last quarter, online sales jumped by 16 percent. But all is not lost for the shop around the corner. Some small retailers are actually embracing their size by making their businesses very, very specialized.

Here's NPR's Sonari Glinton.

(SOUNDBITE OF A CROWD)

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All Things Considered
7:10 am
Wed April 23, 2014

Florida School Offered Kids Caffeine On Test Day

Originally published on Wed April 23, 2014 8:02 am

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

Good morning. I'm Steve Inskeep. Some stores post a warning: Disobedient children will be given and a puppy and an espresso. Maybe that's not so bad. Kids at a Melbourne, Florida elementary school were given caffeine. Each kid was offered trail mix and Mountain Dew on the morning of standardized tests. A grandmother got the school to stop, but the principal says she read a study on keeping kids' energy levels stable. By the way, Creole Elementary is rated an A+ school. It's MORNING EDITION. Transcript provided by NPR, Copyright NPR.

Animals
7:05 am
Wed April 23, 2014

Canadian Police Extricate Bear From Jar

Originally published on Wed April 23, 2014 8:02 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

Good morning. I'm Renee Montagne.

Winnie the Pooh is often found head-first in a jar of honey. For a bear in Canada, birdseed was too much to resist. Residents in Sudbury, Ontario spotted a bear stumbling down the street, unable to see where it was going, because a large jar of birdseed was stuck on its head. It even bumped into a police car. The cops, you will be happy to know, got experts there to sedate the bear and cut the jar off its head.

It's MORNING EDITION. Transcript provided by NPR, Copyright NPR.

NPR Story
5:23 am
Wed April 23, 2014

Urban Libraries Become De Facto Homeless Shelters

Originally published on Wed April 23, 2014 8:02 am

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

Whether they like it or not, libraries in some cities serve as homeless shelters. People come off the streets to find quiet and warmth. If libraries want to do something about this, they have some choices: They can put homeless visitors back out on the street. San Francisco libraries want to get them back on their feet.

Scott Shafer reports from member station KQED.

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NPR Story
5:23 am
Wed April 23, 2014

How Hospitals Can Reduce Disabilities For Stroke Patients

Originally published on Wed April 23, 2014 8:02 am

Research finds when hospitals initiate rapid response programs to treat stroke victims, response time is cut and fewer patients die. The stroke patients also have fewer significant disabilities.

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