Tell Me More on Xtra HD

Weekdays at 11:00am
Michel Martin

From the opinions of global newsmakers to listeners...personal experiences of life-changing travel...the wisdom of renowned thinkers, activists and spiritual leaders...and intimate dispatches of daily life around the world from NPR News correspondents on the ground...the NPR talk show Tell Me More brings fresh voices and perspectives to public radio.

Capturing the headlines, issues and pleasures relevant to multicultural life in America, the daily one-hour series is hosted by award-winning journalist Michel MartinTell Me More marks Martin's first role in hosting a daily program. She views it as an opportunity to focus on the stories, experiences, ideas and people important in contemporary life but often not heard.

"Tell Me More lets me bring together two longtime passions: the intimacy and warmth you experience with powerful radio and the lively, sharp debate about things going on in the world that I enjoy having with friends of diverse backgrounds. That can mean such diverse topics as immigration, gun control, the impact of shock jocks and international adoption," said Martin. "I see Tell Me More as a gathering place for dialogue about the important issues facing the country. But we also talk about the challenges and opportunities we all face living in a fast-paced, complicated society. And we are a home for conversations with NPR News' outstanding correspondents around the world, such as Ofeibea Quist-Arcton and Juan Forero."

Tell Me More focuses on the way we live, intersect and collide in a culturally diverse world. Each day's show features a variety of segments examining U.S. and international news, ideas and people; its range of topics covers politics, faith and spirituality, the family, finance, arts and culture and lifestyle. Some of the regular features include:

  • Dispatches - "on the ground" reports from NPR News correspondents based in Africa, the Caribbean and the Americas
  • Political Chat - a political roundtable of analysts, editorial writers and columnists
  • Wisdom Watch – featuring thoughts of distinguished "elder statespeople," including thinkers, scholars and activists
  • Faith Matters – a forum of spiritual leaders from the major faith traditions sharing opinion on issues of public concern
  • Postcards – listener-contributed content about life-changing travel experiences

Joining Martin is a wide-ranging slate of contributors. They include syndicated columnist Ruben Navarette, blogger Jimi Izrael, East/West Magazine editor Anita Malik, media commentator Keith Boykin and Harriet Cole, lifestyle editor at Ebony.

Tell Me More was first introduced publicly online beginning in December 2006 through a novel "open piloting" program development process launched by NPR titled "Rough Cuts." Martin and the show's producers provided listeners with a regular podcast and blog, all available through www.NPR.org, testing show ideas, offering sample segments, and soliciting user feedback.

Martin brought award-winning experience as a broadcast and print journalist when she joined NPR in January 2006. While developing the program, she has served as contributor and substitute host for NPR newsmagazines, talk shows and NPR News special coverage such as mid-term election night. Martin spent 15 years at ABC News as a correspondent for Nightline and other programs and specials, including the network's coverage of September 11, a documentary on the Anita Hill-Clarence Thomas controversy and a critically acclaimed AIDS documentary. She also contributed reports for ABC News' ongoing series, America in Black and White. Prior to joining ABC, Martin covered state and local politics for the Washington Post and national politics and policy at the Wall Street Journal, where she was White House correspondent. She has also been a regular panelist on the PBS series Washington Week and a contributor to NOW with Bill Moyers.

Tell Me More is produced at NPR's worldwide headquarters in Washington, D.C. It is a production of NPR News in association with the African American Public Radio Consortium, representing 20 independent public radio stations that serve predominantly black communities.

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Money Coach
12:45 pm
Tue February 25, 2014

Understanding How Employers May Change Your Retirement Fund

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

Now we turn from government finance to personal finance. As fewer and fewer American workers receive traditional pension benefits, many are looking to 401(k)s to support them after they leave the workforce. The U.S. Department of Labor estimates that 88 million Americans now have these accounts. But now some employers are changing the way those accounts are handled, and that could force workers to reassess how to prepare for retirement.

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Governing
12:45 pm
Tue February 25, 2014

Who's Paying For Detroit's Recovery Plan?

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

This is TELL ME MORE from NPR News. I'm Michel Martin. We've been following circumstances in Detroit for some time now as the city tries to figure out how to deal with its massive and mounting financial problems. Now there is a new plan to restructure the city's 18 billion dollars of debt, and this plan may have a lot to do with shaping the Detroit of the future. Detroit Free Press columnist Rochelle Riley is back with us to tell us more. Welcome back, Rochelle. Thanks so much for joining us once again.

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Black History Month: #AfroGlobal
2:14 pm
Mon February 24, 2014

Black, British And 'Brain Drained': Playwright Takes Charge In Baltimore

Kwame Kwei-Armah, Artistic Director of Baltimore's Center Stage Theater.
Richard Anderson ©2011 Richard Anderson Photogra

Actor and playwright Kwame Kwei-Armah was born in Britain to immigrant parents from Grenada. His dad worked as a factory worker and his mother worked three jobs to send him to private school in the hope he would become a lawyer. "She wanted me to contribute to the upliftment of my community," he tells NPR's Michel Martin.

In 2003, he became the first black Briton to stage a play in London's prestigious West End theater district with his award-winning piece "Elmina's Kitchen." The play tackled gun crime, displacement and racism in East London.

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Sports
2:14 pm
Mon February 24, 2014

Olympics: Goodbye Sochi, Hello Brazil

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

I'm Michel Martin and this is TELL ME MORE from NPR News. The Winter Olympics games closed yesterday with a spectacular display of fireworks, dance and music, including a thousand children singing the Russian national anthem.

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NPR Story
2:14 pm
Mon February 24, 2014

Rosie Perez: 'I Refused The Limitations That Were Set Upon Me'

Eric Johnson Crown Publishing

Originally published on Tue February 25, 2014 5:33 pm

Actress Rosie Perez first broke into show business in the 1980s as a dancer on Soul Train. She then became a choreographer for the likes of Janet Jackson, Bobby Brown and LL Cool J.

Perez made her film debut in Spike Lee's Do The Right Thing, followed by White Men Can't Jump. She earned an Oscar nomination for the 1993 film Fearless.

Before her career took off, Perez suffered a very difficult childhood. Her mentally ill mother left her to be raised in a convent at age 8. Years of abuse followed.

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Barbershop
11:59 am
Fri February 21, 2014

Are The Barbershop Guys Sorry They Are Not Idris Elba?

Originally published on Mon February 24, 2014 12:11 pm

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

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Faith Matters
11:59 am
Fri February 21, 2014

From Buddhism to Baha'i: Black Faith Spreads Across All Religions

Originally published on Mon February 24, 2014 12:11 pm

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

Let's turn to Faith Matters now. That's the part of the program where we talk about matters of religion, faith and spirituality. It's Black History Month so that got us thinking about the importance of faith to African-Americans throughout history and to this day. But a recent piece in the Huffington Post's religion section also got us thinking about how that faith practice is much more diverse than many people might realize.

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Law
11:59 am
Fri February 21, 2014

Voting Rights: Time To Think Differently For Those Who've Done Time?

Originally published on Fri February 28, 2014 3:18 pm

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

I'm Michel Martin and this is TELL ME MORE from NPR News. We'd like to take a moment now to check in on the evolving debate over crime and punishment. Right now we want to focus on the voting rights of people who have served their sentences.

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Black History Month: #AfroGlobal
12:45 pm
Thu February 20, 2014

Bunji Garlin: Tears For Fears Reminds Me Of Childhood

Bunji Garlin.
Tee Murphy Courtesy of the artist

Originally published on Thu February 20, 2014 5:05 pm

Trinidad and Tobago is gearing up for its annual Carnival, and that means the sounds of soca music will fill the air.

But for Tell Me More's "In Your Ear" series, Trinidadian musician Bunji Garlin says soca is not always on his playlist.

Garlin says Black Eyed Peas Let's Get It Started helps him get "ready to party, get ready to move, get ready to get work done, get ready to get something started."

A star on the soca scene, Garlin also loves Tears For Fears Everybody Wants to Rule the World. "It just lifts my spirit," he says.

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Africa
12:43 pm
Thu February 20, 2014

Former Gadhafi Basketball Player Recalls Escaping Libya

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

We're going to turn now to a side of sports we do not often hear about. Now these days in the U.S. and perhaps the U.K., we talk about the ugly side of sports, but we're talking about hooligans who overreact after a game or maybe abusive coaches or poor personal behavior by players. Now, though, we are going to hear the story of an athlete whose love for basketball landed him in the middle of a civil war.

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Sports
12:43 pm
Thu February 20, 2014

Russia After Olympic Hockey Loss: 'Like A Massive Death In The Family'

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

This is TELL ME MORE from NPR News. I'm Michel Martin. Closing ceremonies for the Olympics are this weekend, but there's still plenty of action left in Sochi. So we're joined once again by William Douglas. He is a reporter for McClatchy, the news organization, and he's the founder and editor of "The Color of Hockey" blog. And he's with us once again from Sochi. Bill, welcome back.

WILLIAM DOUGLAS: Thanks for having me.

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Black History Month: #AfroGlobal
12:47 pm
Wed February 19, 2014

Stromae's Lyrics 'Show A Different Vision Of The World'

Belgian music sensation Stromae acts as a mannequin in the music video for "Papaoutai."
Benjamin Brolet Universal Music France

Originally published on Wed February 19, 2014 2:42 pm

Paul Van Haver — the son of a Belgian mother and a Rwandan father — was raised by his mother in a French-speaking suburb of Brussels. He rarely saw his father, and he struggled academically. When his mother insisted he take up an instrument, he chose the drums.

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Can I Just Tell You?
12:47 pm
Wed February 19, 2014

Michael Dunn And Miami Dolphins Show It's Time To Step Up

Originally published on Wed February 19, 2014 2:09 pm

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

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Around the Nation
12:47 pm
Wed February 19, 2014

'Loud Music' A Case Of 'Testosterone, Guns, And Florida'

Originally published on Wed February 19, 2014 2:09 pm

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MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

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Law
12:22 pm
Tue February 18, 2014

Verdict In Florida's Loud Music Trial Causes Uproar Over Self Defense Laws

Originally published on Wed February 19, 2014 8:54 am

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

This is TELL ME MORE from NPR News. I'm Michel Martin. Today, we want to spend some time talking about that controversial verdict in the trial of Michael Dunn. He is the Florida man who fired into an SUV back in 2012, with four unarmed teenagers inside. He killed one of the teens, then-17-year-old Jordan Davis. Apparently, Dunn was angry because he felt the boys' music was too loud, and he decided they should turn it down. And then a verbal altercation ensued. That's why you might have seen this referred to as the loud music trial.

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