Politics

Latin America
7:07 pm
Mon March 31, 2014

Lack Of Reforms During Latin America's Economic Boom Will Hurt The Region

Soybean harvest in Mato Grosso, Brazil. The South American giant is now the world's largest soybean producer.
Credit sdsoybean.org

For more than a decade, much of Latin America has enjoyed an economic boom. But at its annual meeting in Brazil over the weekend, the Inter-American Development Bank indicated the party is ending. And the situation may be worse because the region didn’t make productive reforms when times were good.

Hear the full story below.

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The Florida Roundup
3:59 pm
Fri March 28, 2014

After 477 Children's Deaths In Florida, What Have We Learned?

Credit Emily Michot / MIAMI HERALD STAFF

 

In its Innocents Lost series, the Miami Herald painstakingly details how 477 children were killed over a period of six years--despite documented warnings to the state Department of Children and Families. Now, leaders in Tallahassee are calling for child welfare reforms.

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Commentary
10:54 am
Fri March 28, 2014

Castro Opens Cuba's Capitalist Door Another Notch – Should Washington Walk Through?

Cuban leader Raul Castro with leaders of the ruling communist party.
Credit Flickr

It may or not be a coincidence that Cuban leader Raúl Castro disclosed his new foreign investment law this week just as Venezuela was getting another big thumbs-down from the financial world.

Cuba’s threadbare communist economy depends on kindred benefactors like socialist Venezuela. But as that oil-rich country’s own economy continues to implode – the Fitch Ratings company downgraded Venezuelan credit to “Outlook Negative” on Tuesday – Castro has no choice but to open his island’s rusted doors more broadly to capital, capitalism and capitalists.

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Politics
4:08 pm
Thu March 27, 2014

Red-Light Camera Ban Creeps To A Halt In The Florida Legislature

Dozens of municipalities around Florida have red light camera programs. An effort to repeal them doesn't appear likely to pass the Florida Legislature this year.
Credit Traffic Safety Ink/flickr

Red-light cameras appear to be safe for another year in Florida. A bid to get rid of them crept to a halt this week in the Florida Legislature.

Senate Transportation Committee Chairman Jeff Brandes, R-St. Petersburg, knew his bill was in trouble, so he suggested changes. He proposed an amendment that would prevent cameras from ticketing drivers who make right turns on red “if the vehicle is traveling less than 15 miles per hour, is not involved in a crash, and no pedestrians are in the crosswalk.”

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Politics
5:18 pm
Wed March 26, 2014

Florida Senate Approves Private Flood-Insurance Market

The National Guard evacuates a Melbourne neighborhood flooded after Hurricane Fay. Home buyers in high risk areas can't get mortgages without flood insurance.
Credit DVIDSHUB/flickr

More than a third of the policies in the National Flood Insurance Program are held by Floridians. But Florida accounts for just a small percentage of the claims that are paid.

Now the national program is billions of dollars in debt because it hasn’t been charging premiums that match the risk.

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Transportation
1:45 pm
Wed March 26, 2014

Shunned By Miami-Dade, Uber Looks For Alliances Elsewhere

Uber's app allows users to rent a town car or SUV from their smart phone. In some cities customers can also use the app to hail a cab.
Credit Justin Scott Campbell/Flickr

Sen. Marco Rubio, as well as several Florida state representatives, are trying to clear the road for a popular smartphone app called Uber to operate in Miami-Dade. The app, which allows people to hire a town car and driver through a few taps of their phone, has been meeting fierce resistance from the county’s taxi companies.

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Latin America Report
5:53 pm
Tue March 25, 2014

Venezuela: Maduro's Offensive Puts Human Rights On The Defensive

Expelled National Assembly member Maria Corina Machado addressing an opposition rally in Caracas last month.
Credit Flickr

Caracas suffered another big power outage on Tuesday. The blackout shut down a hospital and a metro line and left large swaths of the Venezuelan capital without juice for much of the day.

One official response could be an upgrade of oil-rich Venezuela’s antiquated power grid. Another might be more spurious arrests of opposition politicians.

I’m betting on the latter.

That’s because the socialist government of President Nicolás Maduro seems much more skilled at finding scapegoats than at fixing problems.

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DCF
6:32 pm
Mon March 24, 2014

Miami Herald Series Prompts Changes To Florida Child-Welfare Legislation

Changes to the Florida Department of Children and Families are on the way. Lawmakers are considering legislation after a Miami Herald investigation chronicled the deaths of hundreds of children under the state's watch.
Credit Seandel Edwards/flickr

The Miami Herald series “Innocents Lost” may lead to more changes at DCF – Florida’s Department of Children and Families.

The Herald investigation chronicles the deaths of hundreds of children under DCF’s watch.

Sen. Eleanor Sobel, D-Hollywood, is one of the state leaders charged with overseeing DCF as chair of the Senate Children, Families, and Elder Affairs Committee.

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Politics
2:13 pm
Fri March 21, 2014

Florida Legislature Considers Beer Growlers, In-Store Tastings

Tired of the same old wine tastings at your local store? Beer samples may be on tap soon if Florida lawmakers give the okay.
Credit burgerduo/flickr

Half a dozen bills about beer have been filed in the Florida Legislature.

The proposals would essentially do two things: allow certain stores to offer beer tastings - like many already do with wine – and legalize 64-ounce containers of beer.

Florida’s weird packaging laws allow 32-ounce and gallon-sized containers, known as growlers. But 64-ounce growlers are illegal. The law dates back to the prohibition era.

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Politics
10:46 am
Fri March 21, 2014

The End Of FCAT

This spring, students will be taking the Florida Comprehensive Assessment Test for the last time. We look at what's ahead.  

Leaders in Tallahassee call child welfare reforms a priority for this legislative session after a Miami Herald investigation into the Department of Children and Families.  

El Salvador has a new president, Salvador Sánchez Cerén, a former guerilla. Washington worries the new leader could move closer to Venezuela.

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Commentary
6:11 pm
Thu March 20, 2014

Memo To Doralzuelans: Barrio Visits Are More Effective Than Witch Hunts

A hillside slum in Caracas, Venezuela.
Credit Franklin Reyes / Flickr

Of all the on-scene reporting from the deadly anti-government protests in Venezuela, Frank Bajak of the Associated Press may have written one of the most important pieces this week – and it didn’t involve tear gas or street barricades.

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Latin America Report
6:42 pm
Tue March 18, 2014

First Civil, Now Gang Wars. Who Would Want To Be President of El Salvador?

Here’s something you probably didn’t know: Salvadorans are poised to pass Cubans as the third-largest Latino group in the United States, behind Mexicans and Puerto Ricans.

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Politics
5:40 pm
Tue March 18, 2014

Lawmakers Consider Bills To Allow Guns On School Campuses

Guns would be allowed at school under a bill being considered by Florida lawmakers. The bill would allow at least one volunteer or school employee to carry a concealed weapon.
Credit freedigitalphotos.net

An effort to bring guns to school campuses is moving through the Florida Legislature.

The bill sponsors say this isn’t such a far-fetched idea - eight states allow people with concealed-carry permits to bring guns to school.

Supporters say this may be the best chance to save lives. Rep. Greg Steube, R-Sarasota, says research on school shootings has found the attacks are often over before police or deputies can respond.

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Politics
5:34 pm
Tue March 18, 2014

Session Update: Election Law Changes, Guns In Schools, Gov. Askew Dies

Gov. Reubin Askew takes the oath of office on January 5, 1971. He died last week at age 85.
Credit State Library and Archives of Florida

Lawmakers altered their session schedules this week to say goodbye to former Gov. Reubin Askew. He died Thursday at age 85. Flags are flying at half-staff at local and state buildings.

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Politics
5:25 pm
Tue March 18, 2014

Bill To Grant Cheaper Tuition For Undocumented Students Struggles In Senate

No matter how long they've lived in Florida, undocumented students must pay the out-of-state rate to attend college here. It's about three times more expensive than the in-state rate.
Credit freedigitalphotos.net

High school senior Diego Ramirez from Florida City told lawmakers he’s in the top 10 percent of his class. He’s lived in Florida four years and is undocumented.

“I’ve always wanted to go to college [and] become a businessman because that’s my dream,” Ramirez said.

Undocumented students in Florida have to pay out-of-state rate for college, which is three times more expensive.

Now, a bill to grant cheaper, in-state college tuition to undocumented students may be in trouble.

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