saltwater intrusion

Links
6:33 pm
Mon March 24, 2014

What Everyone Is Reading March 16-22

Credit Wilson Sayre / WLRN

If we were to create a fictional story based this week's top five stories, it might go something like this:

Traffic engineers use funds from parking meters to build the Orlando-Miami rail line. The colorful yellow meters do not actually pay the city for parking and were supposed to fund Florida’s desalination facilities. One outraged citizen got a hold of public-radio host Ira Glass, who is now producing a radio story for “This Floridian Life.”

Alas, none of those are stories. Here are the non-fiction versions:

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Desalination
7:40 am
Thu March 13, 2014

Do You Know Where Your Water Comes From?

Florida desalinates the most water in the United States. Above is the water treatment plant in North Miami Beach, the first city in Miami-Dade to process salty water from the Floridan Aquifer.
Credit Elaine Chen

 

If you mention “desalination,” most people probably think you mean taking salt out of seawater, and they probably think you’re talking about what happens in desert nations in the Middle East.

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Sunshine Economy
8:47 am
Mon March 10, 2014

Got Water?

Water being treated on its way to from Florida City to the Keys via a 130 mile pipeline.
Credit Tom Hudson

 

The good news from last summer's rains is that South Florida's water supply is running above average. But that doesn't ease the concerns of those responsible for finding, protecting, cleaning and distributing freshwater to the more than six million people from Pam Beach County through Key West.

They tell us there is no "average" year for water supply. It's either too wet or too dry. And while it's technically the dry season, there's plenty of water.

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Miami Sea Level Rise
8:01 am
Fri February 22, 2013

Miami Among "Most At Risk" For Sea Level Rise, Federal Climate Change Report Says

Coastal flooding will worsen in Miami if climate change patterns continue, according to a federal draft report.
Credit maxstrz / Flickr Creative Commons

Florida -- and Miami in particular -- should prepare for habitat destruction, loss of cropland, increased salt-water intrusion, worsening coastal flooding, and a host of related disasters if climate change and sea level rise patterns continue, according to findings in a federal "draft climate report."

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