Sea-Level Rise

Sea Turtles & Beach Erosion
8:00 am
Thu February 21, 2013

Hurricane Sandy Erosion Will Impact Florida's Sea Turtle Nesting Season

Sea turtles -- like the green sea turtle hatchling seen here -- may need an extra hand during this year's nesting season.
Credit USFWS/Southeast / Flickr Creative Commons

South Florida's beaches in late spring through much of the fall resemble something of a crime scene, or rather, dozens of miniature crime scenes. Brightly colored caution tape and wooden stakes can be found scattered throughout the sand, sectioning off areas where sea turtles have left the water to build nests.

That tableau could look a bit different this year, says marine conservationist Dr. Kirt Rusenko, who is based at the Gumbo Limbo Nature Center in Boca Raton. 

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Sea walls in Palm Beach County
8:29 am
Tue February 19, 2013

Sea Walls Designed To Save Beaches May Actually Speed Up Erosion

Hurricane Sandy and seasonal high tides destroyed much of Fort Lauderdale's beach.
Credit daspader / Flickr Creative Commons

The beach is emblematic of Florida life, so it computes that waterside residents in Palm Beach County are scrambling to find ways to keep the beach from crumbling into the ocean. Unfortunately, proposed sea walls -- meant to slow the beach erosion widely seen throughout South Florida -- actually hasten the problem, according to some environmental groups and government officials. 

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Sea Level Rise
6:10 am
Tue February 19, 2013

Tallahassee Lawmakers Hear How Rising Seas Threaten South Florida

South Florida lawmakers gather at the Capitol to hear about the threat of rising seas.
Credit Gina Jordan/WLRN

The rising sea level threat facing South Florida communities is on the radar of the region's lawmakers.

They recently met at the Capitol to hear from a panel of experts.

Monroe County administrator Roman Gastesi says the waters off Key West have gone up 9 inches in the last hundred years, and the rise is accelerating.

“What we’re looking at now is 9 to 24 inches in the next 50 years,” Gastesi says. “Three to seven (inches) in 20 years.”

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The Florida Roundup
12:00 pm
Fri February 8, 2013

How The Dolphins Stadium Won State GOP Votes

A bill that would allow public money to help fund renovation for the Sun Life stadium unanimously passed a state Senate committee.
Credit Bogeskov

On the Florida Roundup: The Dolphins jump the first hurdles in their quest for public money to upgrade Sun Life Stadium.  

Rising tides on your street - how sea level rise could cost our region millions

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Energy
1:22 pm
Tue February 5, 2013

FPL President Says Controversial Nuclear Fee Has Been Good For Jobs And The Economy

Florida Power and Light President Eric Silagy
Credit http://www.nexteraenergy.com/company/bio8.shtml

Phil Latzman's interview with FPL president Eric Silagy.

Florida Power and Light is the state's largest utility serving roughly 4.6 million customers.

Since 2006, FPL customers have been paying what's called a "Nuclear Cost Recovery Fee," which enables the utility to charge in advance for future costs of building and improving nuclear power plants.

Since then, about $320 million has been raised to add 525 megawatts of new power to Turkey Point in South Miami-Dade.  

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Sea Level Rise
11:54 am
Tue December 11, 2012

The Quick Fix For A Disappearing Beach

Broward leaders need a quick fix for North Fort Lauderdale beach, where State Road A1A has been overrun by the ocean
Credit Broward County

Sand dunes and steel sheets driven underground will be used as temporary fixes to shore up a portion of Fort Lauderdale beach and State Road A1A that have been overrun by the ocean.

The $4.5-million-dollar plan was announced at a public meeting Monday night, the Sun Sentinel reports today, and it will serve as a band-aid until a permanent fix is found.

Broward Mayor Kristen Jacobs says it's the best they can do to deal with the problem in the short term.

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Environmental Degradation
11:47 am
Thu November 29, 2012

Water Pollution Costs Florida More Than $10 Billion A Year

Algae Bloom On A River: Water pollution is costing Florida a lot of money every year.
Credit Galen Herz /Flickr

Local officials around the coast in Florida have already started to deal with the price of sea level rise. Now, another report has put a price tag on the cost of water pollution throughout the state-- the verdict: it's about $10.5 billion a year.

According to the Stockholm Environment Institute, which conducted the study, a lot of the pollution we are dealing with in our water comes from human activities.

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