water

Politics
9:22 am
Wed June 18, 2014

Florida Gets Lion's Share Of Water Bill For Port Expansion, Everglades Restoration

PANAMAXED: Giant new gantry cranes are deployed for the big ships at PortMiami. Port Everglades is preparing to widen and dredge to handle similar vessels.
Credit Ines Hegedus-Garcia/Wikimedia Commons

Florida is the big winner under the new Water Resources Reform and Development Act, which President Obama signed last week. The bill carries $12.3 billion in infrastructure spending for the entire nation and $3 billion of that is coming to the Sunshine State.

There's $2 billion in the bill to expand Florida ports for the new Panamax vessels and another billion to restart four long-stalled Everglades restoration projects. That's 25 percent of the entire appropriation.

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Explainer
4:43 pm
Tue June 10, 2014

Listen: Does South Florida's Water Taste Funny?

Why does South Florida water taste funny? Or at least you think so.
Credit Cyndi Calhoun / Creative Commons/Flickr

How would you describe the flavor of water? The ancient Greek philosopher Aristotle said it "tends to be tasteless." But you probably didn't feel that way when you tried the tap water outside your hometown. Why does water taste so different within the U.S., even within your own state?

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Saltwater
5:05 pm
Mon June 9, 2014

New Map Helps Water Managers Battle Salt

A cargo ship sails down one of Miami's many canals to the ocean. The canals are sometimes a source for saltwater intrusion into the region's groundwater.
Credit Elaine Chen

The U.S. Geological Survey and Miami-Dade County have mapped out the extent of saltwater seepage into our groundwater. The last comprehensive look was in 1995, and the good news is it hasn’t moved much since then.

South Florida is constantly battling against salt: keeping salty ocean water from getting into our groundwater.

The front in our battle, or the saltwater front keeps moving, mostly inland. As of 2011, it’s moved about 460 square miles inland in Miami-Dade. That is about 9 times the size of the city of Miami.

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Natural Resources
9:43 am
Wed October 2, 2013

Florida-Georgia Water Dispute Goes To U.S. High Court As Seafood Industry Suffers

Credit apalachicolabay.org

Florida filed a lawsuit Tuesday in the U.S. Supreme Court in a long-running battle with Georgia over water withdrawals that have damaged Apalachicola Bay, but it may be too late to help the Franklin County seafood workers who were already struggling to survive.

Gov. Rick Scott and Attorney General Pam Bondi followed through on an August announcement that Florida would seek injunctive relief so more water would flow to the bay, which collapsed last year in the face of a historic drought and dwindling releases of freshwater from Georgia.

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Water
2:11 pm
Mon September 23, 2013

U.S. House Panel Rejects Proposal To Federalize Florida-Georgia Water Dispute

Fishermen oystering in Apalachicola Bay.
Credit Stan Kirkland/FWC

Oysters in Northwest Florida are dying off from a lack of fresh water and the oyster industry is struggling because of it.

Much of the freshwater that would normally flow from Georgia into Apalachicola Bay is being cut off and redirected to Atlanta where the growing population needs more water.

Steve Southerland, a congressman who represents the North Florida district heavily hit by the water shortage, proposed a change to the way water management works between Florida and Georgia.

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Water Policy
2:33 pm
Thu August 29, 2013

Gov. Scott Announces $90 Million Everglades Plan In Ft. Myers

Originally published on Thu August 29, 2013 10:25 am

Gov. Rick Scott was in Fort Myers Wednesday surrounded by state, local and federal officials to discuss his plan to deal with the escalating water quality problems in Southwest and Southeast Florida due to ongoing water releases from Lake Okeechobee.

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Politics
10:00 am
Fri March 22, 2013

Who Controls Water Standard Levels In Florida?

The Environmental Protection Agency reached an agreement with the state Department of Environmental Protection Friday to turn over most of its control of water standard levels. The Florida Legislature will have to approve the plan by Dec. 1, 2014 for it to go into effect.
Credit Bogeskov / Flickr

Behind a Florida waterway, a seemingly untroubled scene – behind the turtle sunbathing atop the limestone rock, the water control structure and layers of sawgrass – there’s a political backstage.

The actors: The Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), which currently holds control over water standard levels in Florida, and the state Department of Environmental Protection (DEP), which wants it.

As of Friday, it seems that the two are one step closer to making the swap, which would afford the state jurisdiction over 98.9 percent of the water bodies in Florida.

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Sinkhole Cost in Florida
7:00 am
Thu March 14, 2013

What Florida Homeowners Should Know About Sinkholes

The Florida sinkhole situation is getting a lot of attention.
Credit Richard Elzey / Flickr Creative Commons

The recent spate of sinkhole activity in Southwest Florida -- including a fatal sinkhole in Tampa earlier this month -- has shed light on the state's geologic anomaly. But how do sinkholes impact state economic factors like property insurance and home sales?   

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Florida Environment
3:00 pm
Wed February 6, 2013

Got Opinions On Florida's Environmental Future? State Agencies Want To Hear From You

The tricolored heron (as pictured here at Green Cay Wetlands in Delray Beach) is on the FWC's list of species under consideration.
Credit Tricia Woolfenden

Citizen scientists and environmental stewards take note: Two state agencies are in the process of soliciting public comment on issues that could impact Florida's overall ecological outlook. 

First up is the South Florida Water Management District, which is accepting public comments on four parcels of land in the Upper Lakes Management Region located north of Orlando. These include Tibet-Butler Preserve, Shingle Creek, Lake Marion Creek and Reedy Creek, and SUMICA. 

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Florida's Aquifer
4:00 pm
Wed January 30, 2013

Florida's Current Aquifer Models Paint Inaccurate Picture Of State's Water Supply

Florida's current computer models for tracking underground water flow are coming up short.
Credit eutrophication&hypoxia / Flickr Creative Commons

Understanding how water flows through Florida's aquifers is integral to maintaining  a safe and sufficient supply of fresh water, but current computer models used to monitor the state's aquifers and springs are "full of holes," according to some critics. 

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Florida's Aquifer
11:16 am
Wed January 30, 2013

How Florida's Aquifer Models Are Inaccurate, And Why That Might Be A Problem For Our Water Supply

Florida's current computer models for tracking underground water flow are coming up short.
Credit eutrophication&hypoxia / Flickr Creative Commons

Understanding how water flows through Florida's aquifer is integral to maintaining  safe and sufficient supply of fresh water, but current computer models used to monitor the state's aquifers and springs are "full of holes" according to some critics. 

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Environmental Degradation
11:47 am
Thu November 29, 2012

Water Pollution Costs Florida More Than $10 Billion A Year

Algae Bloom On A River: Water pollution is costing Florida a lot of money every year.
Credit Galen Herz /Flickr

Local officials around the coast in Florida have already started to deal with the price of sea level rise. Now, another report has put a price tag on the cost of water pollution throughout the state-- the verdict: it's about $10.5 billion a year.

According to the Stockholm Environment Institute, which conducted the study, a lot of the pollution we are dealing with in our water comes from human activities.

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