Americas

Brazilian investors buy Miami real estate. Haitian earthquake survivors attend South Florida schools. It's clear what happens in Latin America and the Caribbean has a profound effect on South Florida.

WLRN’s coverage of the region is headed by Americas editor Tim Padgett, a 23-year veteran of TIME and Newsweek magazines.

He joins a team of reporters and editors at the Miami Herald, El Nuevo Herald and NPR to cover a region whose cultural wealth, environmental complexity, vast agricultural output and massive oil reserves offer no shortage of important and fascinating stories to tell.

Tim Padgett produces the weekly Latin America Report, made possible by Espírito Santo Bank.

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Science
6:36 pm
Tue November 26, 2013

How We Left Hurricanes In Our Dust This Year – Literally

What we dodged this year: Haitians struggle through Hurricane Sandy's devastating floods last year.
Credit Carl Juste / Miami Herald

It’s hard to be a fan of hurricanes. Two out of three Haitians don’t have enough food to eat these days – thanks largely to storms like last year’s Hurricane Sandy and how they’ve ravaged Haiti’s agriculture.

And yet we need hurricanes once in a while. They’re a sort of planetary thermostat that cools oceans and redistributes hot air. Their rains more effectively alleviate droughts, and that can be a help instead of a horror to impoverished countries like Haiti.

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Americas
5:00 pm
Mon November 25, 2013

The Mistakes Of Martelly: Why Haiti's President Faces Angry Unrest

Haitian president Michel Martelly meets with Spain's prime minister.

    

When Michel Martelly was elected President of Haiti in 2011, expectations for his performance as a head of state were fairly low. And in many respects, unfortunately, he’s met them.

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Mid-day Links
2:51 pm
Mon November 25, 2013

WLRN's Five Most Popular Stories For Nov. 18-22

Miss Universe, Venezuela's Gabriela Isler.

  This pre-holiday week, from Nov. 18-22, we brought you a bit of nostalgia (see our "Delis Of Yore" post below), some future planning (that's two proposals for Miami-Dade structures) and a little current analysis in the form of beauty-pageant criticism.

Well, we brought you much more than just that. But here's what you liked best:

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Americas
7:40 am
Fri November 22, 2013

Haunted Hondurans: Fleeing The Most Violent Place On Earth

Honduran soccer fans cheer the national team at Miami Gardens' Sun Life Stadium.
Credit Miami Herald

What do you when you live in the most violent place on earth and you can’t take another day of it?

We’re not talking about Syria or Iraq or Afghanistan. This is about Honduras, in Central America, little more than a two-hour flight from Miami. It has the highest murder rate of any nation in the world today, more than 80 per 100,000 people. Its second largest city, San Pedro Sula, has the worst homicide rate of any urban area in the world, almost 175 per 100,000.

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Americas
5:19 pm
Mon November 18, 2013

How Venezuela Won Miss Universe – And Lost Its Relevance

Miss Unvierse 2013, Venezuela's Gabriela Isler
Credit Wikipedia.org

What do Miss Universe and Miami Herald South America correspondent Jim Wyss have in common? Not a heck of a lot physically. But quite a bit symbolically: Left-wing Venezuelan President Nicolás Maduro would have liked to use both of them recently to distract voters from his so-far disastrous administration.

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Americas
10:22 am
Thu November 7, 2013

A Soft — And Prosperous — Landing For Cubans Is In The U.S.'s Interest

A private Cuban shop vendor
Credit Brookings Institution

There are two basic realities about Cuba’s communist dictatorship that U.S. policy, and the anti-Castro hardliners that shape it, prefer to ignore. The first is that the Castro brothers will almost certainly die in power. The second is that market-oriented economic reforms, albeit tentative, are as much a part of Cuba’s landscape today as 1956 Chevrolets.

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Americas
8:07 pm
Tue November 5, 2013

Miami Versus Pinochet: As Chile Holds An Election, It Recalls Justice in Florida

Gen. Augusto Pinochet's dictatorship killed or "disappeared" roughly 3,000 Chileans.
Credit Center for Justice and Accountability

Chile’s northern Atacama Desert is arguably the driest place on Earth. In some parts of it, rainfall has never even been recorded.

Which means, if you’re a mass murderer, it’s also a fairly dumb place to bury your victims.

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Americas
6:00 am
Mon November 4, 2013

Battling For Brazilians: Broward Challenges Dade For Latin American Tourists

Fort Lauderdale Beach is gaining more Latin American visitors, who previously beelined for Miami's oceans.
Credit Eric Barton

In the 1980s, after the bolívar crashed and Venezuelans suddenly couldn’t fly to Miami every weekend, a gaita band recorded a sardonic song whose chorus lamented, "Qué triste domingo sin Miami Beach."

How sad Sunday is without Miami Beach.

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Americas
4:55 pm
Thu October 31, 2013

The Billionaire Who Personified Brazil's Boom Goes Bust

Batista appears with Brazilian President Dilma Rousseff during a ceremony in celebration of the start of oil production by OGX, Batista's oil and gas company, in 2012. The company filed for bankruptcy Wednesday.
Ricardo Moraes Reuters /Landov

Originally published on Thu October 31, 2013 6:14 pm

He was boastful, he was brash and he came to represent a booming Brazil that was finally taking its place as an economic powerhouse on the world stage.

Eike Batista had the cars: a Mercedes McLaren worth a quarter of a million dollars parked in his living room; the boat, called "the Pink Fleet," and the women: He was married to a former Playboy model and a Carnival queen.

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